spatulate


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spatulate

[′spach·ə·lət]
(biology)
Shaped like a spoon.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
2F, G) with pair of very long dorsal membranous conjunctival appendages gradually tapering in width, specially apical portion very thin, somewhat sickle-shaped, posterior portion acuminated, pair of ventrolateral conjunctival appendages placed moderately apart, like shoe-horn-shaped and U-shaped; pair of spatulate sclerotized penial lobes, a little longer than vesica.
Also, the leaves of Annularia sphenophylloides are spatulate and possess a markedly swollen, rounded, mucronate apex that is quite distinctive.
triphylla have a spatulate apex when adult, character also observed in D.
In specimens with 20 pairs, ~12 had the comb-like tips and eight were spatulate.
1D) broader than long; with single pseudospiracular opening; subepandrial plate large, semicircular in dorsal view; hypoproct broadly U-shaped, densely pilose, covering bases of epandrial claspers; epiproct small, oval; epandrial claspers curved, carrying three distal tenacula in one row; tenacula spatulate, 87 pm long, tips slightly expanded.
Baskin, "Dormancy-breaking and germination requirements of seeds of four Lonicera species (Caprifoliaceae) with underdeveloped spatulate embryos," Seed Science Research, vol.
It has often been stated that the plastron and the large spatulate spines are the main locomotory structure [5, 9].
With a deep body and spatulate tail, it resembles a bass fisherman's swimbait--made for rigging on an offset worm hook for steady reeling over and through heavy cover.
Gonopore processes long and spatulate with rounded tips.
Morphophysiological dormancy in seeds of two North American and one Eurasian species of Sambucus (Caprifoliaceae) with underdeveloped spatulate embryos.
This is a perennial herb with basal leaves forming a rosette, which varies seasonally: winter rosette, with spatulate to lanceolate leaves, up to 4 cm long and 1.5 cm wide; summer rosette, with obovate to nearly circular leaves, up to 10 cm long and 7 cm wide, with glandular hairs on the upper side that secrete a digestive mucilage that makes the leaves sticky (de Rzedowski and Rzedowski, 2001).