special relativity


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special relativity

(rel-ă-tiv -ă-tee) See relativity, special theory.

special relativity

[′spesh·əl rel·ə′tiv·əd·ē]
(relativity)
The division of relativity theory which relates the observations of observers moving with constant relative velocities and postulates that natural laws are the same for all such observers.
References in periodicals archive ?
In this world the gravitational potential is the same in any point and thus the cosmological redshift is favoured as a kinetic phenomenon of special relativity. In this case there is no need for an equation of the state specifying pressure in cosmology.
Nowak, "Non-commutative spacetime of Doubly Special Relativity theories," International Journal of Modern Physics D, vol.
Spacetime Physics: Introduction to Special Relativity, 2nd ed.
Time dilation is referenced in the theory of special relativity. It is only really evident when objects travel close to the speed of light, so it's hard (though not impossible) to provide any practical examples from everyday life.
(Actually, a correction is also needed for special relativity, since the satellites' rapid motion slows their clocks.
We are not interested in the well established formulation of Special Relativity, which are well documented in texts and the internet, but rather in the role of the observers whose characteristics have been implicitly assumed and never been questioned.
As a result, his theory of special relativity was essentially complete as first set out.
Thermal equilibrium and statistical thermometers in special relativity. Physical Review Letter, 99, 170601.
Einstein's theory of special relativity completely transformed modern physics; not only did it do away with the old notions of absolute space and time, it also introduced some new and rather startling fundamental concepts.
The instantaneous "action at a distance" did not fit well into special relativity, which is based on a finite speed of interaction.

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