spectacle


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spectacle

[′spek·tə·kəl]
(zoology)
A colored marking in the form of rings around the eyes, as in certain birds, reptiles, and mammals (as the raccoon).

Spectacle

Speed (See SWIFTNESS.)
Aïda
opera renowned for its scenic grandeur; sometimes played with on-stage elephants. [Ital. Opera: Verdi Aïda in Benét, 16]
Barnum and Bailey circus
“greatest show on earth,” famed for outstanding displays. [Am. Culture: Collier’s, V, 110]
Birth of a Nation, The D. W.
Griffith’s monumental Civil War film. [Am. Cinema: Halliwell, 51]
Ziegfeld Follies
elaborate New York musical entertainment (1907–1931) with gorgeous settings and dancers. [Am. Theater: NCE, 3045]
Folies Bergère
opulent musical show in Paris featuring dancers, rich costumes and scenery. [Fr. Theater: EB (1972 ed.), IX, 515]
References in classic literature ?
They turned their heads, and there was the Cynic, with his prodigious spectacles set carefully on his nose, staring now at the lake, now at the rocks, now at the distant masses of vapor, now right at the Great Carbuncle itself, yet seemingly as unconscious of its light as if all the scattered clouds were condensed about his person.
Take off those abominable spectacles, and you cannot help seeing it
Now these colored spectacles probably darkened the Cynic's sight, in at least as great a degree as the smoked glasses through which people gaze at an eclipse.
The Cynic, having cast aside his spectacles, wandered about the world a miserable object, and was punished with an agonizing desire of light, for the wilful blindness of his former life.
Featherstone, locking his box and replacing it, then taking off his spectacles deliberately, and at length, as if his inward meditation had more deeply convinced him, repeating, "I should think it handsome.
The old gentleman in the tortoise-shell spectacles looked at his companion, he nodded significantly.
With a slight turn of the head the glitter of the spectacles seemed to gauge the size of the beer saloon in the basement of the renowned Silenus Restaurant.
This is a transcendental way of putting it," said Ossipon, watching the cold glitter of the round spectacles.
The other turned his spectacles upon Ossipon like a pair of searchlights.
He levelled his spectacles at the latter's face point-blank.
Situationist Guy Debord's (1931-94) concept of spectacle cannot be understood fully if it is treated independently from his views of time and history, claims Bunyard, because for Debord, time exists independently of humanity, but history is specific to human beings, as it corresponds to humanity's existence in time, and to its awareness of that existence.
On the whole, what the spectacle wearer wants is to look great in their glasses--some will want to stand out in the crowd, others not--it's the same with all fashion items really.