specular surface

specular surface

[′spek·yə·lər ′sər·fəs]
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

specular surface

A mirror-like surface which reflects light at an angle equal to that of the incident light.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Architecture and Construction. Copyright © 2003 by McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Berkner, "Single-shot specular surface reconstruction with gonio-plenoptic imaging," in Proceedings of the IEEE International Conference on Computer Vision (ICCV '15), pp.
Recently, the conventional photometric stereo techniques have been extended to specular surfaces with varying bidi-rectional reflectance distribution function (BRDF).
It uses advanced algorithms for omni-directional reading to ensure high read rates at high speeds, including those on round, reflective or specular surfaces. Supported by a Web-based app for quick setup and configuration, the fixed-mount reader can be quickly installed by remote access with a mobile device.
A series of experiments were conducted in the latter part of 2010 and early 2011 to obtain transmitted illuminance of direct sunlight and diffuse daylight from the sky for light pipes of specular surfaces. Some selected experimental results are reported here with computational results.
Both the highly reflective white surfaces and specular surfaces minimize light loss; however, our repor t is limited to specular mater ials, which can reduce energy usage in luminaires through the way they direct and control light.
Ten minutes before the work was to sell for [pounds sterling]311,700 ($625,150), one could see a parade of collectors and dealers streaming across its specular surfaces. Toby Webster, owner of the Modern Institute in Glasgow, who sold the painting for less than a tenth of this auction price in 2006, told me that he doesn't see Reyle's work as abstract.
Glare from specular surfaces (mirrors, glass, etc.) will reduce visual quality and occupant comfort.
Souter advises homeowners to be aware of "specular surfaces: anything that might reflect light.
The most important problem that has been solved recently is dealing with specular surfaces. When the light shines from a certain direction, some surfaces act almost like a mirror; you see the light reflected, but you can't tell anything about the surface itself.
The problem of specular surfaces is just one among many, but I think we're getting better and better at visual sensing in general.
Computations were measured in "geological time units." The former approach is most suitable for specular surfaces; the latter, for diffuse environments, Actually, both approaches attempt to solve the same problem-the difference is in the starting point.
Today, work is continuing at Cal Tech, Tokyo, Cornell, and probably several other places to tractably solve the "illumination equation"the thermodynamical balance between all incoming and outgoing light for environments with both diffuse and specular surfaces. But we must solve this problem before shortcuts can be taken.