spherical surface

spherical surface

[′sfir·ə·kəl ′sər·fəs]
(mathematics)
A surface whose total curvature has a constant positive value but that is not necessarily a sphere.
References in periodicals archive ?
0], when moving in an ascending warm air flow, is capable of pulling polarized water molecules radially oriented along this field due to the action of its own radial electric field to its outer spherical surface (Fig.
In the electrodes area of the spark plugs there is an additional segment of the spherical surface.
Although curvature over a spherical surface is constant from the centre to the periphery, power in fact varies creating peripheral defocus and reduction in visual quality.
10] m; the latter location marks the presence of a nodal surface, the single spherical surface between r = 0 and r [right arrow] [infinity] at which function [[psi].
In both cases, with the elements being the most densely packed in the volume, the reduced minimum linear dimension of the outer spherical surface will be as follows:
As shown in Figure 1(b), for the rotational sliding in soil slopes, the form of the slip surface is complicated and is influenced by the geological conditions; however, the critical slip surface can be assumed to be a spherical surface or ellipsoidal surface, which can explain most conditions of the actual landslide characteristics in soil slopes.
Because of the electrochemical profile and smooth spherical surface of Argonne's carbon microspheres, anode electrodes made of them cycle lithium more safely than industry-standard graphite electrodes, significantly improving the safety of lithium-ion batteries, which is key to transportation applications.
To support this conjecture, Williams used a numerical model of a shallow, two-dimensional flow of uniform density on a spherical surface.
After the wooden hemispheric moulds, the layers of papier-mache, and the plaster, there was the tricky business of applying sections of flat printed maps ('gores' is the technical term) to a spherical surface.
At the watch back is a Tri-LED Heart Rate Sensor integrated into a soft spherical surface, which replicates the action of a doctor using his/ her fingertip to feel a pulse.
Using isosceles triangles, Fuller found a way to divide the spherical surface into equal flat surfaces, obtaining thus an image of a complete spherical structure made of bars (Figure 4).