spherules

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spherules

(sfe -rool) Small round particles of rock and wüstite (iron oxide) formed by the solidification of molten meteoritic material that flows off a meteorite during its passage through the Earth's atmosphere. Magnetic spherules can easily be recognized in deep sea sediments. Sizes range typically from 10 μm to 200 μm.
References in periodicals archive ?
When inhaled into the warm lungs of a mammalian host (37[degrees]C), these infectious propagules convert into pathogenic yeast (or spherules for Coccidioides) to cause pneumonia [1].
The spherules are seen as spherical elements with thick walls, 5-60 [micro]m, with numerous, small, globular endospores of 2-5 [micro]m in their interior (4).
The Curie curves of the magnetic extraction showed the presence of some Fe particles, with low Ni-content, interpreted by the author as low-Ni iron spherules originated from the vaporized K-T impactor.
In Kaali area (Island of Saaremaa, Estonia) both magnetite-silicate and silicate spherules were identified [2].
Arthrospores are inhaled and converted to spherules in the lung where they swell, sporulate, burst, and release spores.
The large spherules (10-80 mcm) are easily seen under microscopy, typically as granulomatous or suppurative inflammatory infiltrate.
No sub-hydrothecal spherule. Perisarc relatively thick, usually yellowish.
The commercial Catalloy process is similar in concept to Himont's developmental Hivalloy technology except that where Catalloy is an olefinic alloying process, Hivalloy products are made by co-reacting the base PP spherule with up to 50-60% by weight of non-olefinic monomers.
During the studies of 1994 we found a high concentration of glassy spherules (microimpactites) in the Lower Atlantic peat of Piila mire 10 km northwest of the Kaali craters (Fig.
Although the spherules could have come from volcanoes, the droplets' widespread distribution and mineral composition suggest they condensed from a cloud of rock vapor blasted into and above the atmosphere after a massive impact.
The spheres appear to accumulate in the leaky vasculature, or blood vessels, of tumours, releasing their cargo in a controlled, sustained fashion as the spherule walls and scaffolding break down in the bloodstream.
"No matter what the exact chemistry of these spherules was to start, the fact that they're there tells us [that] a lot of liquid water moved through these rocks over time," Briony Horgan, a planetary scientist at Purdue University in Indiana, said during an (https://www.space.com/42645-mars-blueberries-formation-mystery-earth-analogs.html) interview .