spin glass


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Spin glass

One of a wide variety of materials which contain interacting atomic magnetic moments and also possess some form of disorder, in which the temperature variation of the magnetic susceptibility undergoes an abrupt change in slope, that is, a cusp, at a temperature generally referred to as the freezing temperature. At lower temperatures the spins have no long-range magnetic order, but instead are found to have static or quasistatic orientations which vary randomly over macroscopic distances. The latter state is referred to as spin-glass magnetic order. Spin-glass ordering is usually detected by means of magnetic susceptibility measurements, although additional data are required to demonstrate the absence of long-range order. Closely related susceptibility cusps can also be observed by using neutron diffraction. It is not generally agreed whether spin glasses undergo a phase transition or not. See Magnetic susceptibility, Neutron diffraction, Phase transitions

spin glass

[′spin ‚glas]
(solid-state physics)
A substance in which the atomic spins are oriented in random but fixed directions.
References in periodicals archive ?
Beckman, "Measurement of complex susceptibility on a metallic spin glass with broad relaxation spectrum," Journal of Magnetism and Magnetic Materials, vol.
Then, we review some of the magnetic ground states such as superparamagnetism, superspin glass, surface spin glass, and superferromagnetism in ensembles of MNPs.
We then poured them densely into the tray obtaining the nematic non-lattice structure like the spin glass (Fig.
Patterns can get frozen prematurely, and then the spin glass as a whole can't readily reach the state with the lowest energy.
In observing unicorns, he makes friends with the elusive "Spin glass" and introduces it all 'round.
The result is a spin glass, meaning that the spins are randomly oriented.
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Later chapters cover low-dimensional frustrated quantum spin models, pyrochlores, and classical and quantum spin glasses where disorder and frustration act simultaneously.
Each of these aspects is illustrated schematically and in terms of physical examples, chosen from multicritical phenomena, quantum phase transition, spin glasses, relaxation, phase ordering and quantum dissipation.
Here Wadhawan (Bhabha Atomic Research Center, Mumbai, India) provides an overview of current research and a tantalizing look at what is to come, explaining information processing by biological and artificial smart structures, the role of ferroic materials (including spin glasses, multiferroics and ceramics), soft matter (including colloids, polymers and polymer gels, liquid crystals and ferrofluids), self-assembly and organization of matter, nanostructures (including two-dimensional microfabrication procedures), elements of human intelligence, smart censor systems, sensors and actuators for smart structures, machine intelligence, and the future of smart structures, including the possibility of creating new life forms.
Stein studies complex materials known as spin glasses, which have discordant, disorderly magnetic interactions amongst their constituent atoms, and he sees a connection between mathematical models of spin glasses and the concept of adaptive landscapes.
The topics of the papers include the Anderson model of magnetic impurities, the study of spin glasses, the fluctuating valence problem and superexchange, the Josephson effect, and the "Higgs" mechanism in elementary particle physics.