spinning jenny


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spinning jenny

an early type of spinning frame with several spindles, invented by James Hargreaves in 1764
References in periodicals archive ?
Starring Kerrie Hayes and Matthew McNulty, the show was set in the turbulent year of 1833 when the Industrial Revolution was changing the country faster than you can say spinning jenny. A second season will follow this year.
Who invented the spinning jenny, a yarn-making machine?
There are also tablets in the Nave in memory of John Wyatt (1735 -1797), the inventor of a spinning machine used before Arkwright's Spinning Jenny.
The spinning wheel was superseded by the spinning jenny and the spinning frame at the beginning of the industrial revolution in the mid 18th century.
* THE winners of the Cardiff Writers' Circle competition held on November 7 were Jan Marsh, winning first prize and the Muriel Ross Trophy for Spinning Jenny.
The 'Spinning Jenny' revolutionised the production of cotton in 18th century England - and eventually the world - and is a great example of disruptive technology.
Its title, no doubt, refers to the spinning jenny, a late-eighteenth-century invention that increased, by multiple factors, the speed and efficiency with which a spinner could spin twine.
The middle of the 18th century witnessed a popular expansion in the market for printed fabrics, one that resulted in a remarkable series of technological innovations of which James Hargreaves' spinning jenny of 1764 and Richard Arkwright's spinning frame of 1768 are the most notable.
THE divisive issue of new technology has long been a bone of contention in these parts, ever since the dark days of the mechanisation of the textile business during the Industrial Revolution, when my great-great-great-great grandfather Elijah Thomas got his hand caught in a spinning jenny while working the night shift at a mill in Blackburn.
THE SOURCE: "The Industrial Revolution in Miniature: The Spinning Jenny in Britain, France, and India" by Robert C.
Kenyon Review, and Spinning Jenny. She interviews artists for At Length
Suspended in the atrium, it brings to mind the outlandish inventions of British pre-war illustrator Heath Robinson, while its principal purpose, to gradually weave a huge threaded knot, which will descend to floor level during the three month exhibition, is allied to the great (and now) low-tech inventions of the industrial revolution, like James Hargreaves' Spinning Jenny and its off-shoot, the Mule, invented by Samuel Compton of Bolton.