spinster

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spinster

1. Law (in legal documents) a woman who has never married
2. (formerly) a woman who spins thread for her living
References in periodicals archive ?
I study the prim little writing table, the narrow spinsterish bed, pondering the incongruity of this as the setting for the passionate cry:
At the beginning, reading her diary while she awaits the visit of her celebrated mother, Liv Ullmann-as-Eva seems pretty clearly, in her spinsterish appearance and manner, to be a manic-depressive type, melancholy and retentive but prone to fitfulness as well.
She attributed his attitude to his "well-known anti-feminism," [29] which Rosalind Franklin, the English physical chemist, was later to experience when, unbeknownst to her, he used her experimental data on the structure of the DNA molecule in his own work, won a Nobel Prize, and then drew a vicious portrait of her as a spinsterish feminist in Tue Double Helix.
A correspondent to Grit, `One String Jack', berated him for equating the two evils and thus playing `into the hands of the Booze party' by `keeping on with these spinsterish deprecations of smoke'.
When Budge's truncheon points at the spinsterish Aunt Lucy, to Giles he represents the "just rage of authority." "Got her, Giles thought, taking sides with authority against his aunt" (161).
Miss Robinson, a wrinkled spinsterish woman, must have had at least forty twin sets of cashmere sweaters, in every color, which she wore with a plain gray wool skirt and brown oxfords.
Reacting "personally" has become a weakness Cordelia returns -- James's ultimate putdown -- to the cozily spinsterish role of a pet detective, a finder of lost Chihuahuas.
This passion perhaps explains my contact with a spinsterish, wire-haired, eccentric black woman in her late sixties named Mrs.
In the terms of a nineteenth-century division of labour, both exhibit a spinsterish imagination, passive, yearningly watching from the margins a rough male world, and like the Lady of Shalott full of morbid curiosity about it, not at all squeamish but with a vicarious sensuality, like 'that vein of stark brutality which was yet wide of all realism' (p.
In Dancing at Lughnasa, the blazing revel of the title comes not at any natural point of climax but midway through Act 1, as the five spinsterish Mundy sisters find release from working-class drudgery one summer day in 1936 in a Dionysiac outburst common to Friel's work.
Her dress and bearing, and the way her patient and colleagues react to her, tell us that she is spinsterish, even frigid and in need of a "good man" who will soften her into a compliant woman.
HIS voice prissily spinsterish, his face sprouting wispy tufts of Old Man's Beard, the Archbishop of Canterbury lurches from error to idiocy.