spit

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spit

1
1. another name for spittle
2. a light or brief fall of rain, snow, etc.

spit

2
an elongated often hooked strip of sand or shingle projecting from the shore, deposited by longshore drift, and usually above water

Spit

 

a low and narrow alluvial strip of land in the coastal zone of a sea or lake. Attached at one end to the shore, a spit is composed of sand, pebbles, gravel, and shells. It is formed through alongshore displacement of debris as a result of bending of the shore cusp by a flow of debris. Sometimes a spit is formed from the intake of debris along the shore from two opposite directions. Such a spit sharply protrudes into the open sea and is called a tongue (for example, Dolgaia Kosa on the coast of the Sea of Azov).

spit

[spit]
(engineering)
To light a fuse.
(geography)
A small point of land commonly consisting of sand or gravel and which terminates in open water.

SPIT

Language for IBM 650. (See IT).

SPIT

(SPam over IP Telephony) Unsolicited advertising appearing in a VoIP voice mailbox. Let us pray we never have to listen to instances of SPIT like we have to wade through spam in our email, or SPIT may be the most appropriately named acronym yet! See spitter, SPIM, VoIP and spam.
References in periodicals archive ?
Plath's poem shifts focus many times: from shell and bookends, to the sea, to the speaker's father, to Bocklin's painting, to symbols of pre-Christian religion (and the sacrifice of a "spitted ox"), to the three male Fates, to the speaker's everyday need to "go down the shabby stair, and, finally, to Anchises witnessing the fall of Troy.
They are linked through imagery: Die is associated with the tamed and spitted falcon (155); Helen is compared to a hawk about to pounce upon its prey (366).
in a moment look to see The blind and bloody soldier with foul hand Defile the locks of your shrill-shrieking daughters, Your fathers taken by the silver beards And their most reverend heads dash'd to the walls, Your naked infants spitted upon pikes....
Latin food and flavors are having a turn in the sun, from the daring dishes of Michael Cordua's Americas (perhaps the largest South American wine cellar in North America) to the big new entry from Southern Brazil, Fogo de Chao (it means "campfire," but what a campfire!) superb meat and fowl seasoned, spitted and roasted to perfection, brought to the table and carved under customer supervision.
The first genuinely good meal the Pilgrims had in this country was probably turkey, spitted and roasted--barbecued, that is--over an open fire.
Spitted bodies, bellies dull and glowing from the fire beneath, feet tied like victims, their eyes were alive, alive, and though their small hairy mouths moved not at all the song continued to grow, to burn as they burned.
35 Defile the locks of your shrill-shrieking daughters; Your fathers taken by the silver beards, And their most reverend heads dashed to the walls; Your naked Infants spitted upon pikes, Whiles the mad mothers with their howls confused Do break the clouds, as did the wives of Jewry
The wonders of modern technology make it possible to render the burning of every bone and the tasting of every organ as a sequence of pleasant images rather than as strips of flesh spitted on skewers and five-pronged forks.
19 Philip Quarles demonstrates his scientific knowledge of how 'ten generations of cooks have employed infra-red radiations to break up the protein molecules of spitted ducklings' (p.
Wikander, `The Spitted Infant: Scenic Emblem and Exclusionist Politics in Restoration Adaptations of Shakespeare', Shakespeare Quarterly, xxxvii (1986), 340-58, esp.
The present show is the first major exhibition of his work in this country, and one now can look at the marvelous caricatures of Hitler, of his henchmen, the scary image of the dove of peace spitted on a bayonet in front of the League of Nations building in Geneva, and all the sarcastic readings of the Nazis' speeches and slogans.
We soon had a fire blazing, and stood around it, under the damp and sombre forest of firs and birches, each with a sharpened stick, three or four feet in length, upon which he had spitted his trout, or roach, previously well gashed and salted, our sticks radiating like the spokes of a wheel from one centre, and each crowding his particular fish into the most desirable exposure, not with the truest regard always to his neighbor's rights.