splay


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Related to splay: Splay tree

splay

a surface of a wall that forms an oblique angle to the main flat surfaces, esp at a doorway or window opening

Splay

A sloped surface that makes an oblique angle with another at the sides of a door or window, with the opening larger on one side than the other; a large chamfer; a reveal at an oblique angle.

splay

[splā]
(engineering)
A slanted or beveled surface making an oblique angle with another surface.

splay

A sloped surface, or a surface which makes an oblique angle with another, esp. at the sides of a door, window, proscenium, etc., so the opening is larger on one side than the other; a large chamfer; a reveal at an oblique angle to the exterior face of the wall.
References in periodicals archive ?
Also, some non-hygroscopic polymers (polyolefins, for example) are not susceptible to hydrolysis, but may need drying because water adhering to the surface of the pellets will cause visual splay, but no degradation of properties.
With its wicked sense of invention, Splay Anthem is a victory for the progress of language itself.
The foaming tests were also inconclusive because visible splay on the part surface indicated that the amount of blowing agent should probably have been reduced before this technique could be compared fairly with the other methods.
Black and brown streaks and splay are among the most common ills seen in polycarbonate parts (see PT, Nov.
When injection molding splay problems strike, instead of blaming the material, take another look at the screw.
He reduces figures to iconic and cartoony signs, using high-keyed color and pancaking form to brighten and splay his images against the wall.
Nascote immediately discovered that SVG provided relief from splay and paint-adhesion problems that intermittently affected the part.
This means that where the decollment is shallow and many splay faults reach the surface, the folds will be narrow and closely spaced; deep decollements result in wide folds at greater distances from one another.