splinter group

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splinter group

a number of members of an organization, political party, etc., who split from the main body and form an independent association, usually as the result of dissension
References in periodicals archive ?
Seasoned expert on militancy Rahimullah Yousafzai said, "At the moment the type of attacks and new trends shows that TTP or other splinter groups have weakened.
Officials said the splinter groups have teams for surveying and catching targets, killing and documentation.
While the well-known Asaib Al-Haq and Kata'ib Hizballah are the biggest Mehdi Army splinter groups, dozens of others have appeared, working as mercenaries and killing for sponsors inside and outside Iraq, Sadrist and Iraqi security officials said.
Politically the splinter groups are nothing, less than an irrelevance.
The Racial Volunteer Force ( RVF) is described on Wikipedia, the internet encyclopedia, as "the a violent splinter group of the British neo-Nazi group Combat 18 with close ties to far right paramilitary group, British Freedom Fighters.
Back in Canada, Quebec City Westminster, BC, the four ministers who had opposed Bishop Michael Ingham's promotion of church-approved sodomy since 2002 resigned in May 2004 and they and their parishoners have joined the Anglican Communion of Canada, another addition to the already existing splinter groups who are all trying to preserve "traditional" Christian moral teachings within an Anglican framework.
While Plaid Cymru is imploding into nationalist squabbling and splinter groups, we are presenting ourselves as a genuine alternative.
The other danger is the range of enemies facing our troops - al-Qaeda fighters and other splinter groups.
Such splinter groups want to knock back both the mainstream Republican movement and the British Government of a peaceful course - but they will not succeed.
The United States has some 300 Christian denominations, a slew of deeply divided Jewish traditions, a growing but divided Muslim constituency, plus hundreds of faith expressions that can't be labeled, not to mention countless splinter groups within these groupings.
Cuneo points to the irony that many of these splinter groups, seeking shelter from the corrosions of American life, are actually reliving one of the most familiar patterns in American religious history.