split-plot design

split-plot design

[′split ‚plät di‚zīn]
(statistics)
An experimental design that enables an additional factor or treatment to be included at more than one level; each plot is split into two or more parts.
References in periodicals archive ?
Table 4 gives the results of scaffold characterization for the 18-run split-plot design. The measured scaffold thickness, diameter, and weight were used to calculate the scaffolds density and porosity.
The layout of the experiment was a split-plot design, where intercropping treatments (pure Clitoria, pure Sudan grass and a mixture of both Clitoria and Sudan grass) were randomly assigned to main plots and fermented manures (PM,CM, PMCM, in addition to control) were assigned to sub-plots.
Keep the power loss on HTC factor(s) in mind before settling for a split-plot design. Perhaps grouping HTCs for convenience may not be worth this cost--you would be better off taking the trouble to randomize the whole design.
A split-plot design was not used due to possible plot border effects resulting from different growth rates of different adjacent plant material types.
We monitored field yield of several crops in a split-plot design where half the beds were planted with a clover living mulch.
The study had a split-plot design with four replications, and the trial was conducted under field conditions from 2010 to 2013.
These parametric analyses incorporated a mixed model, split-plot design, in which sites were considered random factors (B(A)) nested within the seeding treatment (A) (Quinn and Keough, 2002).
Experiment data is collected from four treatments of ([A.sub.0]'[A.sub.1]'[A.sub.2]'[A.sub.3]) at seven times and in three replications using split-plot design in time, the effect of treatments and mutual relation between them is determined in the form of completely randomized design and randomized complete block design at different times.
Exploring how a variable changes over time in different groups is a frequent aim in educational and psychological research (e.g., exploring differences in cognitive development between boys and girls), and in these cases, the study is usually based on a split-plot design. Indeed, split-plot designs, namely those in which there are one or more grouping factors on which individuals are repeatedly measured on two or more occasions, are the most commonly used in educational and psychological research (Bono, Arnau, & Balluerka, 2007; Keselman et al., 1998).