spoiler


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spoiler:

see airplaneairplane,
 aeroplane,
or aircraft,
heavier-than-air vehicle, mechanically driven and fitted with fixed wings that support it in flight through the dynamic action of the air.
..... Click the link for more information.
.

spoiler

[′spȯi·lər]
(aerospace engineering)
A plate, series of plates, comb, tube, bar, or other device that projects into the airstream about a body to break up or spoil the smoothness of the flow, especially such a device that projects from the upper surface of an airfoil, giving an increased drag and a decreased lift.
(electromagnetism)
Rod grating mounted on a parabolic reflector to change the pencil-beam pattern of the reflector to a cosecant-squared pattern; rotating the reflector and grating 90° with respect to the feed antenna changes one pattern to the other.

spoiler

spoilerclick for a larger image
A vertical spoiler projects upward into the airstream.
spoiler
A plate, series of plates, comb, tube, bar, or other device that projects into the airstream about a body to break up or spoil the smoothness of the flow, especially such a device that projects from the upper surface of an airfoil, giving an increased drag and a decreased lift. Spoilers are normally movable and consist of two basic types: the flap spoiler, which is hinged along one edge and lies flush with the airfoil or body when not in use, and the retractable spoiler, which retracts edgewise into the body. In some cases, spoilers are linked to the ailerons and work in unison with the ailerons for improved lateral control at low speeds. In some aircraft, they have replaced ailerons. The spoilers are used as airbrakes, lift dampers, and a means of lateral control.

spoiler

1. a device fitted to an aircraft wing to increase drag and reduce lift. It is usually extended into the airflow to assist descent and banking
2. a similar device fitted to a car

spoiler

(1)
A remark which reveals important plot elements from books or movies, thus denying the reader (of the article) the proper suspense when reading the book or watching the movie.

spoiler

(2)
Any remark which telegraphs the solution of a problem or puzzle, thus denying the reader the pleasure of working out the correct answer (see also interesting). Either sense readily forms compounds like "total spoiler", "quasi-spoiler" and even "pseudo-spoiler".

By convention, Usenet news articles which are spoilers in either sense should contain the word "spoiler" in the Subject: line, or guarantee via various tricks that the answer appears only after several screens-full of warning, or conceal the sensitive information via rot13, or some combination of these techniques.
References in periodicals archive ?
He wrote on Facebook: I don't know if the spoiler window lasts a day, a season or forever?
When the pilot exercised those circuit breakers, it played havoc with the spoilers. Turns out the pitch-and-roll computers in the Tomcat have had a somewhat high failure rate.
However, spoilers reveal he will not make it to the end of star Becca Kufrin's journey to find love.
Luckily, thanks to a handy Chrome extension and Twitter setting, it can be as easy to avoid The Last Jedi spoilers as it is to dodge a shot from a stormtrooper's E-11 blaster rifle.
'The Flash' Season 1, Episode 9 Spoilers: Barry Allen vs Reverse Flash, Robbie Amell's Firestorm To Shock Caitlin (http://au.ibtimes.com/articles/575388/20141210/flash-season-finale-episode-reverse-spoilers-firestorm.htm) (Update)
A spoiler update reveals what he does about that, and there will be a time jump to get right into the answer.
On a theoretical level, researchers want to better understand how people write spoilers and what kind of linguistic patterns and common knowledge mark a sentence as a spoiler.
[USPRwire, Fri Jul 05 2019] The automotive rear spoiler is designed to disrupt the air movement by creating the vertical force that acts on the tire by causing traction on the road.
A first definition of spoiler might be revealing any information about a work of fiction (in any form, such as a book, TV show, or movie) to someone who hasn't encountered it.
The author explores philosophical aspects of spoilers, discussing the history of spoilers, their definition and nature, and the role of vagueness; the ethics of spoilers, including whether spoiling can be bad, sources of the badness, when it is wrong and okay to spoil, timing issues, and spoiler alerts; and the pragmatics of spoilers, including paradoxes, spoiling remakes, whether reactions to spoilers are justified, cultural aspects and relativism, and what to do when encountering someone who spoils.