Sponge Bath

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Sponge Bath

 

a preventive treatment during which the individual parts of the body are rapidly rubbed with either a coarse cloth or a rubber sponge moistened in water whose temperature, at first 32°–30°C, is gradually lowered to 20°–18°C. Sponge baths cause the body to feel warm, refreshed, alert, and infused with strength. They are used to strengthen the body and increase its resistance to colds. They are also prescribed for overfatigue and neurasthenia, between rheumatic attacks, and when the body is weakened after disease.

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There was no running water so the boy had to take daily sponge baths. He heated the water on the small propane stove.
The astronauts were unable to take baths or showers, washing instead with a large hand cleaner and wet wipes for sponge baths. The shuttle contained a hi-tech toilet which used a strong flow of air to pull the waste away.
Sponge baths are okay, but there's nothing like a shower to rinse off the day's grime.
Asking during one of Ruby's convalescent sponge baths, Did you wash your little sister, hon?
As a temporary solution to the inconvenience and discomfort of cold sponge baths, a microwave-able hospital-made bath called the "Tottman Technique" could be given.
Back rubs, sponge baths and rocking babies have become luxuries of the past.
By using hammock-like bath seats (also called bath chairs) made of plastic, fabric, or foam (so that the water can drain easily) that can be placed on metal frames with legs (adjustable to different heights) and include supports to secure the child, parents can put a child into a tub at a level that is safe for the child and workable for parents (both hands free) giving baths (sponge baths) or showers (usually with a hand-held flexible shower hose).