spongy


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spongy

[′spən·jē]
(mechanical engineering)
Property of a robot whose end effector has high compliance, so that a small force applied to it results in a large motion.
References in periodicals archive ?
In his series, OCT identified spongy retinal thickness seen in 58% of eyes.
africanus fossils have concentrations of spongy bone at the base of the thumb and in the knuckle of the third finger, a pattern found in humans and Neandertals.
The lower density of spongy bones in modern humans supposedly result in the bones being more vulnerable to being fractured or damaged.
I found it very easy to reach every inch of my back, and the spongy pad massaged the lotion well into my skin.
When their hands and feet are exposed to water, the skin quickly turns white and spongy and individuals are prone to fungal infections.
But, according to experts, the discovery of a spongy mazegillis is especially significant as it is normally only found in a few locations across the south-east of England and the New Forest.
Although I didn't realize it at the time, the trigger on my old release was simply too & spongy and had too much travel to foster good shooting habits.
Like most polymer pistols, however, the factory XD series suffers from what might be described as a slightly spongy trigger release.
I also particularly liked the bit about how matches were created in those days - using white phosphorus for the tips, which served to poison those that made them by emitting vapours that turned their bones spongy.
Bone marrow is a spongy material found in the hollow centres of some bones and contains special cells known as stem cells.
A PATIENT GAVE BIRTH to a child who had Canavan disease, a neurologic disorder characterized by spongy degeneration of the central nervous system, with death often occurring by 4 years.
2 : not loose or spongy : compact <a solid mass of rock>