spontaneous

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Related to spontaneous regression: spontaneous regression of cancer

spontaneous

(of plants) growing naturally; indigenous

spontaneous

[spän′tā·nē·əs]
(physics)
Occurring without application of an external agency, because of the inherent properties of an object.
References in periodicals archive ?
However, spontaneous regression of an osteochondroma is extremely rare.[2] We present a case of a 9-year-old boy who complained of the anterior knee pain after trauma and was subsequently diagnosed with an osteochondroma of the distal femur that almost completely regressed within 4 years.
Koushik Tripathy for his interest and constructive comments regarding our case report entitled "Spontaneous Regression of Optic Disc Pit Maculopathy in a Six-Year-Old Child'' published in Turk J Ophthalmol.
Spontaneous regression has been observed without scarring within 2-5 months; however, cutaneous atrophy of the affected areas can follow recovery from the condition.
Spontaneous regression (SR) of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is a rare event.
The three main theories explaining spontaneous regression of a herniated nucleus pulposus (HNP) are dehydration, retraction and inflammation-related resorption.
Some researchers consider all gastrointestinal tract melanomas to be metastatic from cutaneous origin, as it is well known fact that some cutaneous melanomas suffer spontaneous regression [7].
Spontaneous regression of the mass may occur during the first trimester.
In the other patients, rhabdomyomas showed spontaneous regression (Table 3).
Myofibromas also have been reported to be successfully treated with serial subtotal resections followed by complete spontaneous regression, which is a phenomenon thought to result from massive cellular apoptosis.
(6,7) Spontaneous regression has been reported in up to 25% of patients and stabilization in up to 50% of patients.
Some CGCEs may demonstrate nonclassical features, such as fibrosis and spindle cell proliferation (as seen in Figure 3), which may result during trauma or spontaneous regression of the lesion.

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