spoof

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Related to spoofery: spoofy

spoof

spoof

To play a trick on someone. See spoofing and how to spoof your techie friend.
References in periodicals archive ?
So, he's taken an old 60s stage play by Robert Thomas, recruited a who's who of three generations of France's iconic actresses, slapped on a large dollop of camp and Hollywood musical spoofery and shot it all on an old-fashioned one room set in 50s-style Technicolor.
Among all this spoofery is a very real message - "If you find a poodle in your noodles they'll give you pounds 10,000 compensation".
The New Poetry editors attempt to justify this contradiction by speaking of this poetry's postmodern literariness as a form of "cultural spoofery," deploying an over-extended idea of irony to make it appear more radical than in fact it is.
Its mix of slapstick and clever spy spoofery is a riot but I really must protest at the way cats are portrayed once again as the villains.
Unfortunately, the result wasn't pop culture spoofery so much as lounge-act surrealism.
Although the ironic twisting of medieval conventions of heroism may be considered part of novel's spoofery, the devaluation of love subverts another cultural force long-considered positive.
Tom Holland's original pic, best remembered for Chris Sarandon as the alluring vampire Jerry but hobbled by archness and overacting, was an early contributor to the mock-horror trend that finally tilted over into "Scream's" spoofery. In every department, the redo reps an effort to rebalance the tone in a much edgier, scarier direction, while steering away from camp.
But this isn't just played for laughs spoofery. There's proper Godfather style drama playing out in the inter Family rivalry and resentments as new boss Uncle Junior flexes his muscles, and, as per rule book, bodies are dumped, deals are negotiated, cops are corrupted.
If "Cars" was perhaps the least engaging of Pixar's hugely successful animated features, John Lasseter and his team have hit the creative accelerator with the unexpectedly delightful "Cars 2." The rare sequel that improves on its predecessor, this lightning-paced caper-comedy shifts the franchise into high gear with international intrigue, spy-movie spoofery and more automotive puns than you can shake a stick-shift at, handling even its broader stretches with sophistication, speed and effortless panache.
That does not exactly describe, say, the John Doyle revival of "Sweeney Todd," the adolescent angst of "Spring Awakening" or the campy pop-culture spoofery of "Xanadu," though the latter (which kicked off its six-month tour at La Jolla Playhouse this month) at least has the benefit of being an upbeat antidote to economic blues.
The show's 25th anniversary edition, drolly titled "Rude Awakening," still packs plenty of bite in its far-from-benevolent spoofery, delivered as always by a cast of four performers as tireless as they are versatile.