spot relamping

spot relamping

The replacement of each lamp in a lighting system, individually, at the time it fails. Also see group relamping.
References in periodicals archive ?
At first consideration, performing spot relamping might seem like the more affordable choice, as you are only replacing lamps when they are needed.
Where spot relamping would render some lights stronger than others or put together incompatible lamps, group relamping provides even lighting, which can contribute to better occupant comfort and productivity.
In a large and mature fluorescent lighting installation that is maintained via spot relamping, lamps will fail on an ongoing basis.
Despite recommendations to group relamp [IESNA 2001], spot relamping is still most common [Houser and others 2010].
To keep lamps, such as metal halides, working properly and to reduce the need for rampant spot relamping, some experts recommend a preemptive process called "group relamping." When lamps are maintained using group relamping, all lamps are replaced at the same time.
Spot relamping, or replacing lamps as they burn out, is the most common strategy for maintaining a lighting system.
Group relamping is the practice of periodically restoring the lighting system to new by completely replacing all the lamps at a particular point in time while spot relamping during the interim years.
Owners either did not know what lamps were used, or in some cases a variety of lamps were used as a result of spot relamping. Most fields used BT56 lamps.
Spot relamping, the practice of replacing lamps one at a time as they expire, can become a tiresome task for maintenance professionals.
Spot relamping was an arduous and costly task involving renting a lift to reach the ceiling.
However, studies show that labor costs for these maintenance methods, commonly called "spot relamping," can be up to five times more expensive than relamping an entire area on a regular, planned basis.