spotter

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spotter

1. a person who makes a hobby of watching for and noting numbers or types of trains, buses, etc.
2. Films
a. a person who checks against irregularities and inconsistencies
b. a person who searches for new material, performers, etc.

spotter

[′späd·ər]
(optics)
(ordnance)
An observer stationed for the purpose of observing and reporting results of naval gunfire to the firing agency, or in designating targets.
References in periodicals archive ?
During a tornado, Scruggs and his fellow spotters may get as close as a quarter-mile away, depending on the road, but usually try to stay farther out, perhaps as far as 10 miles.
We have garnered about 10,000 spotters and we have about 50,000 data points in clients and have given away an excess of Dh20,000 to app users.
Platforms "A battle of wits between spotters and police usually ensued, with tactical withdrawals and local skirmishes occurring all over the platforms and vantage points which formed the battlegrounds of New Street station.
Babcock, before adding that many people have always had enough interest in the weather to become spotters.
The Dreamliner is scheduled to do day trips to other Australian cities, but is expected to return to Sydney Airport overnight throughout its stay in Australian, where plane spotters may be able to catch a glimpse of it near the Domestic terminal.
Spotters can enjoy a day out in Amsterdam between sailings.
A shark spotter stationed on the beach was warned by a person on the mountain that someone had entered the water.
In conjunction with the Sunday coffee, the space-age, retro-themed Encounter Restaurant, located underneath the Observation Deck, will offer a "Plane Spotters Lunch Special" from 11:00 to 16:00.
Mr Donald, who gave up the hobby in 1977 at the age of 16, bemoaned that spotters are becoming a dying breed and that there are no longer many interesting trains to look at.
Spotter Eddy Foakes, 51, from Newmarket, Suffolk, said: "It's fantastic to see all the aircraft fromRussia.
One of the UK's major suppliers of satellite navigation devices incorporating camera spotters has announced that it is going to their rescue.
And Mr Twigg warned it was essential that spotters reported any strangers who joined their ranks and behaved unusually, because they could be infiltrators.