Spout

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Spout

A short channel or tube used to spill stormwater from gullies, balconies, or exterior galleries, so that the water will fall clear of the building; a gargoyle.

spout

A short channel or tube used to spill storm water from gutters, balconies, exterior galleries, etc., so that the water will fall clear of the building. Also see gargoyle.
References in periodicals archive ?
Larger, more efficient spouts offer faster loading times that equates to cost efficiency and profitability for the trucking company as well as the facility.
The pump sucks the water up through a tube and out of the spout, where it trickles or falls into the cistern below and then back out again.
The system then automatically pivots the bag connection frame back to horizontal, raises the entire fill head, inflates the bag to remove creases, fills the bag at a high rate, finishes filling accurately at dribble feed rate, deflates the spout seal, releases the bag loops, raises the fill head to disengage the spout, rolls the bag out of the filling area, and rolls a new pallet into place to begin another cycle.
YACHATS - In the beginning Jim Adler created the sculpted whale and the system to ensure that it would spout every minute.
The Grohe Minta Touch is available with an elegant C-shaped spout with extensible spray or with a stylish L-shaped spout with extensible mousseur.
For overhead discharge the bulk-bag-to-hopper interface consists of a Spout-Lock[R] clamp ring positioned above a pneumatically actuated Tele-Tube[R] telescoping tube, dust-tight connections and unrestricted flow between the bag spout and hopper coupled with automatic tensioning of the bag as it empties allowing unrestricted flow and complete bag evacuation.
A height-adjustable cappuccino spout and a height- and width-adjustable coffee spout give the user the versatility and a 20-ounce stainless steel vacuum milk container keeps milk cold and ready to froth or steam on demand for up to eight hours.
Since their development by Mathur and Gishler (1955), conventional spouted beds have been used in a number of applications (Mathur and Epstein, 1974; Epstein and Grace, 1997).
Tub spouts unscrew (Photo 2), or pull off if they have a setscrew underneath.
Both spouts are self-vented and have an O-ring seal to prevent leaks.
The package with a perforated header can then be removed, allowing the spout to be opened.