spray transfer

spray transfer

[′sprā ‚tranz·fər]
(metallurgy)
In arc welding, transfer of filler metal across the arc to the workpiece in the form of droplets.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Students will receive more in-depth and hands-on training of MIG (arc welding process), TIG (gas tungsten arc welding) and stick welding, and a method called spray transfer. They will learn foundational skills in welding fabrication processes with the introductory basic certificate, and to specialize their craft with the advanced certificate.
* Pulsed transfer is midway between spray transfer and dip transfer mechanism, which can be too 'cold' (due to noncontinuous arcing, the arc effectively 'goes out' between each melting cycle).
Airless spray transfer efficiency is higher than conventional air spray, and offers the ability to spray the widest variety of coatings.
The reactivity of the oxygen with the arc intensifies its heat and accelerates the spray transfer process without producing additional drive.
Weld metal is transferred from the electrode via a spray transfer mode during a high peak pulse of current.
Spray transfer efficiency (TE) is defined as the mass fraction of sprayed paint which is deposited on the intended target, the remainder of the sprayed paint becomes undesirable overspray.
In pulsed MIG welding (a modified spray transfer process), the peak current pinches off a spray-transfer droplet, while the background current is at a level that maintains the arc and prepares the wire for the next pulse.
Airless sprayers cover large areas in a short amount of time and give you decent spray transfer efficiency (the amount of paint going onto the surface, not into the air).
ArmorWear deposits a premium martensitic alloy steel of H-12 tool steel composition and maintains its hardness up to 1,000 degrees E It has a steady arc and smooth spray transfer and is best suited for flat and horizontal hard surfacing.
"We are running wire so hot," says Recker, "that the liner and core have a tendency to heat up and change the parameters of the spray transfer." He notes that the internal systems of the power source compensate for the heat so that the burnback is not an issue and deposit rates stay consistent.
A relatively hot weld (27-V/116-ipm wire feed) and a 95:5 argon/oxygen gas mix is used to produce a spray transfer condition during processing.