squeegee


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Wikipedia.

squeegee

(less commonly), squilgee
1. an implement with a rubber blade used for wiping away surplus water from a surface, such as a windowpane
2. any of various similar devices used in photography for pressing the water out of wet prints or negatives or for squeezing prints onto a glazing surface

squeegee

[′skwē‚jē]
(design engineering)
A device consisting of a handle with a blade of rubber or leather set transversely at one end and used for spreading, pushing, or wiping liquids off or across a surface.
References in periodicals archive ?
A LOT of people hate the squeegee merchants who ambush motorists at red lights.
To cut costs, I ordered twelve small screens, twelve bases with wing nut hinges attached, some extra screening fabric, squeegees, water soluble inks, and tape and cord to replace screens.
The results of thermal cycling delivered similar results, indicating use of an activated squeegee offered a more robust print process and could enhance solder joint reliability performance.
Condensate collected via the squeegee can be analysed both chemically and microbiologically in order to provide additional 1 information in the development of food safety risk assessments.
Made in America, TheEZGrip squeegee is manufactured in Phoenix, AZ, USA.
Smearing, as has been discussed in this column on many occasions, is indicative of a setup or input (gasket, squeegee, tooling) issue.
That's right, using a squeegee, comb over the carpet and it will lift up embedded hairs and dust that would just get matted down by a vacuum cleaner.
Hank Guitjens, Commercial Manager Label Printing, SPGPrints, comments: "Squeegee technology is at the heart of rotary screen printing.
Operators concerned with the amount of moisture remaining on the belt have the option of adding a squeegee roller, which lifts the belt slightly
The machine's design includes a simple rotary switch for setting the operating mode, the function to change the roller brush and squeegees without tools, a separate cable guide, and height-adjustable handlebars.
Critique: Another terrific read from an accomplished author, "Life in New York: How I Learned to Love Squeegee Men, Token Suckers, Trash Twisters, and Subway Sharks" by Laura Pedersen is replete with informative and entertaining New York phenomena and offbeat historical facts, making it very highly recommended for personal and community library collections.