squinch


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squinch,

in architecture, a piece of construction used for filling in the upper angles of a square room so as to form a proper base to receive an octagonal or spherical dome. It was the primitive solution of this problem, the perfected one being eventually provided by the pendentive. Squinches may be formed by masonry built out from the angle in corbeled courses, by filling the corner with a vise placed diagonally, or by building an arch or a number of corbeled arches diagonally across the corner. In Islamic architecture, especially in Persia, where it may have been invented, the squinch took the form of a succession of corbeled stalactites. It was also commonly used in the early churches of Europe and the East.

Squinch

Corbeling built at the upper corners of a structural bay to support a smaller dome or drum; a small arch across the corner of a square room which supports a superimposed octagonal structure above.

Squinch

 

in architecture, a vaulted structural component consisting of parts of a cone or half or quarter of a spherical cupola. Squinches are usually employed for the transition from a square substructure to a round or polygonal superstructure and to a cupola or its drum. They are sometimes also used to support angular cupolas and oriels. Squinches were widespread in the medieval architecture of Southwest and Central Asia, the Transcaucasus, and Europe; in Russia they were used primarily in the 17th century.

squinch

[skwinch]
(architecture)
A small arch across the interior corner of a structure to support a superimposed mass such as a dome or spire. Also known as squinch arch.

squinch

squinch, 2
1. Corbeling, often arcuate, built at the upper corners of a structural bay to support its tangent, smaller dome or drum.
2. A small arch across the corner of a square room which supports a superimposed mass; also called a sconce.
References in periodicals archive ?
The first panel in this squinch is occupied by a clumsily drawn female figure, her hair plaited in a tail.
NAOMI MATTHEW: 12.20 Here's The Key, 12.50 Mr Prickle, 1.25 Squinch, 2.00 Its A Classic, 2.35 Woodlands Gem, 3.05 Kinkeel, 3.35 Teenage Kicks.
Girls, he said, better not squinch your eyebrows like that when talking to me, before things get ugly.
SQUINCH (skwinch)--an old measure of snuff (a contraction of square inch) there being four pinches to the squinch [a small arch built across the interior angle between two walls]
Your delight, which is contagious, has been occasioned by the twinkling point of a steak knife about to liquify your eye, so when your father swats it from your prehensile fist you squinch your blooming face tight as a blastocyst as if all the world's pain had conceived inside your skull ...
The palace area consists of a sequence of courts leading into each other, and its much ruined buildings reveal the routine use of domes, pointed arches, pyramidal vaults, ribbed vaults, and squinch zones.
Other papers are devoted to more particular matters -- the hammer-beam roof over Westminster Hall, iron reinforcement in the Louvre, John Smeaton's use of hydraulic cement in the Eddystone lighthouse, and ribbed vaults and squinch arches in cathedrals.
I squinch my eyes shut and try to picture him in the Schumacher on Lexington Avenue waving a baton at the Parish-Hadley wall coverings.
Although they're not the traditional clientele, they practiced their duck faces, fish gapes, squinches, and model pouts in preparation for the big event.
removing algae and washing of dirty surface of fine masonry from its exterior, installation of shisham wood door as per the original existing design approved by competent authority, shisham wood work over doors and squinches and some other places as per existing size, shisham wood pendants in squinches and arches as per existing design, average Kankar lime plaster on dome with glazed lime plaster and lime terracing on top of parapets and passages on first and second storeys.
The squinches convert the square room into an octagonal shape and house a circular dome.
Similarly, in frescoes, episodes from the life of Christ, the Mother of God, the saints, or Old Testament events were depicted as separate episodes side by side; artists skillfully used the architectural divisions of a building, such as squinches and corners, to contain a scene.