squint

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squint:

see strabismusstrabismus
, inability of the eyes to focus together because of an imbalance in the muscles that control eye movement; also called squint. It is a consequence of weakness or uneven development of one or more of the six small muscles that surround the eye.
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squint

[skwint]
(electromagnetism)
The angle between the two major lobe axes in a radar lobe-switching antenna.
The angular difference between the axis of radar antenna radiation and a selected geometric axis, such as the axis of the reflector.
The angle between the full-right and full-left positions of the beam of a conical-scan radar antenna.
(medicine)

low-side window, leper’s squint, offertory window, squint

A small low window, usually on the right side of the chancel, through which the altar may be seen.

squint

squint, 2
squint, 1
1. A small opening, often obliquely cut, in the wall of a church, generally so placed as to afford a view of the high altar from the transept or aisles.

squint

1. the nontechnical name for strabismus
2. a narrow oblique opening in a wall or pillar of a church to permit a view of the main altar from a side aisle or transept
3. having a squint
References in periodicals archive ?
Sophie's daughter Louise was born prematurely in 2003, causing a condition called strabismus which left her with what the countess described as a "profound" squint.
In cases of less pronounced strabismus, the advantages of electronic measurement can provide the additional accuracy needed to identify even the smallest of squints.
Most patients with convergent squints present before school age, usually between the ages of 2 and 3 years.
Q dear Doctor, I think that my son who is three may have a squint but am not sure as it does not seem to be there all the time.
Squints and lazy eyes, particularly in children, must be treated by eye specialists (ophthalmologists).
This is a minor problem at the present time but like all childhood squints it needs to be taken seriously to avoid long term problems.
Squints normally happen between one and two years old when the eyes are developing rapidly, or at about five when the child starts to read more.
There's often no significant underlying cause, but it's important that children with squints are referred to a specialist to exclude problems (such as cataracts or retinal damage) and to arrange treatment (like glasses).
A boy stands in the yard, squints and holds a whip.
Montana forester Lars Halstrom squints into the sun and eyes a pair of Clark's nutcrackers atop a whitebark pine tree high in the mountains of the Absaroka-Beartooth Wilderness.
Each section features a number of short videos, which are presented by practitioners and explain how squints arise, what different types of squint there are and what patients, or parents of a patients, should expect when they go to a clinic.
A SQUINTS in new-borns are common as they often have difficulty focusing.