squire


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squire

1. Feudal history a young man of noble birth, who attended upon a knight
2. Austral an immature snapper (see snapper (sense 2))
References in classic literature ?
Livesey fairly slapped his thigh, and the squire cried "Bravo!" and broke his long pipe against the grate.
Dance," said the squire, "you are a very noble fellow.
'I have misjudged him,' said the Squire. 'Do you know where he is?'
He was still ailing, it was said, and the Squire nursed him like the proverbial woman.
"Stint it, Humphrey," said the tall squire, with a burst of laughter.
"Sweet little coz!" answered the burly squire. "Such a dainty color!
Far better would it be for us who have adopted this accursed service to go back to our own houses, and there employ ourselves in pleasanter occupations -in hunting or fishing, for instance; for what squire in the world is there so poor as not to have a hack and a couple of greyhounds and a fishingrod to amuse himself with in his own village?"
"In truth and earnest, sir squire," said he of the Grove, "I have made up my mind and determined to have done with these drunken vagaries of these knights, and go back to my village, and bring up my children; for I have three, like three Oriental pearls."
By such kind of talents he had so ingratiated himself with the squire, that he was a most welcome guest at his table, and a favourite companion in his sport: everything which the squire held most dear, to wit, his guns, dogs, and horses, were now as much at the command of Jones, as if they had been his own.
Now, as she had some influence on the squire, so Tom had some little influence on her.
The greatest man in Raveloe was Squire Cass, who lived in the large red house with the handsome flight of stone steps in front and the high stables behind it, nearly opposite the church.
Something unwonted must clearly be in the wind, for the old squire's visits to his tenantry were rare; and though Mrs.