squire


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squire

1. Feudal history a young man of noble birth, who attended upon a knight
2. Austral an immature snapper (see snapper (sense 2))
References in classic literature ?
Livesey fairly slapped his thigh, and the squire cried "Bravo
Dance," said the squire, "you are a very noble fellow.
I had not ventured to propose it,' replied the Squire.
But I cannot stomach the man with the carbuncles,' thought the Squire.
Why, you do it like a country boor, and not like a gentle squire.
You brought it upon yourself, John Tranter," said the tall squire, who had been addressed as Roger Harcomb.
In truth and earnest, sir squire," said he of the Grove, "I have made up my mind and determined to have done with these drunken vagaries of these knights, and go back to my village, and bring up my children; for I have three, like three Oriental pearls.
O how little you know about compliments, sir squire," returned he of the Grove.
By such kind of talents he had so ingratiated himself with the squire, that he was a most welcome guest at his table, and a favourite companion in his sport: everything which the squire held most dear, to wit, his guns, dogs, and horses, were now as much at the command of Jones, as if they had been his own.
Now, as she had some influence on the squire, so Tom had some little influence on her.
Betty Jay scented the boiling of Squire Cass's hams, but her longing was arrested by the unctuous liquor in which they were boiled; and when the seasons brought round the great merry-makings, they were regarded on all hands as a fine thing for the poor.
Poyser," said the old squire, peering at her with his short-sighted eyes--a mode of looking at her which, as Mrs.