stabilator

(redirected from stabilators)

stabilator

[′stā·bə‚lād·ər]
(aerospace engineering)
A one-piece horizontal tail that is swept back and movable; movement is controlled by motion of the pilot's control stick; usually used in supersonic aircraft.

stabilator

stabilator
Stabilator.
A single-piece, horizontal tailplane that combines the functions of a stabilizer and an elevator.
References in periodicals archive ?
Among the others on the list are: AD 63-12-2, on elevator butt ribs and doubler plates; 63-26-3, elevator and rudder castings; 72-21-1, control pedestal support bracket; 74-10-1, flap hinges; 78-2-3, stabilator tip tubes and weights (on Aztec F); 78-8-3, rudder hinge brackets (Apache 150 and 160); 79-26-1, stabilators (most F models); 80-18-10, fuel selector valves and cables; 80-26-4, cabin entrance step support frame structure; 81-4-5, flap controls and hinges; 85-14-10, Hartzell blade clamps; and 88-21-7, fuel lines, caps and filler compartment covers.
Even with two faired ailerons, sufficient roll control is provided by differential stabilators. One problem I previously had noticed was the other aileron would not fare quickly, causing an initial element of roll.
As the images on this and the next page illustrate, elevators and stabilators can be mounted in various ways, depending on engineering needs.
The 3rd Combat Aviation Brigade was immediately forced to shift their focus to replace damaged blades, stabilators and windows following the storm.
Your article on Pages 22-23 of PS 718 (Sep 12) is not quite correct on how the stabilators move.
While not the focus of this paper, some of the findings during this period resulted in changes (called engineering change proposals [ECP]) to the raked wingtips, the dogtooth horizontal stabilators, the enlarged speed brake, and 20 other engineering or manufacturing refinements.
Engineers hope to obtain almost equivalent roll performance on production F/A-18s at transonic and supersonic speeds without using the horizontal stabilators and with smaller control surface deflections.
Under the so-called "Cardinal Rule" program, it retrofitted leading slots to stabilators on Cardinals already in the field.
The stabilators provide tremendous drag and will slow the aircraft down in short order without use of the brakes, especially at higher speeds.
The resultant undamped manual control of only the stabilators created an initial nose-down pitch, and my instinctive aft-stick correction caused a violent nose-up pitch.
Quinlan's aircraft had two FODed engines, damage to the aft fuselage, and damage to the left vertical and horizontal stabilators. Maj.
At 100 knots, with my feet firmly on the brakes, I pulled the stick toward my lap to get the huge stabilators into the wind to create more drag.