stalling angle

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stalling angle

[′stȯl·iŋ ‚aŋ·gəl]
(aerospace engineering)
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

stalling angle

The angle of attack at which the flow of air over the wing begins to separate from the wing surface, resulting in a significant reduction in the lift and an increase in the drag. The lift coefficient of an airfoil is maximum at this angle and begins to decrease rapidly at angles beyond it. A stalling angle is fixed for an airfoil, whereas the speed at which it will stall is not. Also called the critical angle of attack* See stall.
An Illustrated Dictionary of Aviation Copyright © 2005 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved
References in periodicals archive ?
It gives good performance with a stall angle between 10 to 15 degrees compared to NACA0012.
Most of these researches only focus on linear interval of incidence angle, that is, within stall angle. To give an insight into flight dynamic characteristics near the flight boundary especially for poststall region, nonlinear icing effect model for a wide range of angle of attack should be established.
Most of the current icing effect model can only get the decreased lift coefficient and cannot reflect the change of stall angle. This is due to the essence of these models; they only count the percentage of alteration for each derivative.
(1) The agreement between computed and experimental values of lift coefficient is very good up to stall angle. Near and above stall angle, the lift coefficient continues to increase.
"So here they are," he adds, "with a job involving ground reference maneuvers and they haven't had any ground reference training." What the Kenyan pilots had no concept of is the relationship of bank angle and load factor to stall angle of attack.
During this excursion, the angle of attack reached 15 degrees and, a second later, exceeded the 17-degree stall angle of attack.
The stall angle of attack decreases, which translates to a higher stall speed, the exact value of which depends on the wing and the amount and type of ice.
The company does not call it an angle of attack instrument, but does state that the LRI identifies the absolute stall angle for any aircraft.