stall break

stall break

stall breakclick for a larger image
The moment during the execution of the stall maneuver when the aircraft nose comes down as the wing loses lift. To instigate the stall maneuver, the aircraft nose is raised by moving back the control column. This results in a reduction in the speed and the tendency of the nose to drop, thus necessitating further backward movement of the control column. This process is continued until the break takes place. The aircraft is recovered by decreasing the back pressure on the controls and applying full power to accelerate away.
An Illustrated Dictionary of Aviation Copyright © 2005 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved
References in periodicals archive ?
In part because they have a greater tendency to enter unrecoverable spins after a stall break than a piston single.
With full aft stick, it was just descending without a stall break." Lancair IV-P owners sweat if the airspeed drops below 100 knots anywhere before the landing flare, so this looks like the aerodynamic equivalent of raising Lazarus.
But you're not truly in a stall until, in most aircraft, the buffeting warning of stall gives way to the nose pitching down--the stall break. Visually, at the break the airplane's nose will be well above its pitch attitude in normal operations, at least until you're flaring for the landing.
But we don't want to repeat this cycle, so at the stall break or onset of mush ease off back pressure on the yoke and begin to slowly halt the post-stall descent.
Depending on the airplane and how it's configured, you may run out of rudder authority before the stall break. And when flying a twin and demonstrating [V.SUB.MC], you definitely want to recover well before that point.
Again, if the stall break occurs in uncoordinated flight, the result often is a spin.
More horribly, since contamination is often distributed unevenly, the stall break will not be typical.
At or near the stall break, large control input can be made--often must be course, the airplane itself likely will contribute some sensations, like buffeting and vibration.
In fact, the way to enter a spin is to add full rudder in the desired spin direction at the moment the stall breaks. Unless you want to demonstrate a spin, keep the ball centered.
Then there are big things, such as the stall behavior of airplanes lacking camber in the tail surfaces (Piper Cub, Aeronca Champ, etc.) when the ball is not centered at the stall break. The airplane rolls quickly and pitches down sharply.
George talks about the stall break being more subtle in a turning stall due to the offset of the elevator force.
In a well-rigged trainer there is not even a significant "stall break:" The plane will just hang in a level flight attitude with no gyrations and indicate about a 1500-fpm descent.