stall

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stall,

small division of a larger space, sometimes partly partitioned. The term is used for a booth for display and selling at an exhibition, for a compartment in a stable or kennel, or, in England, for the forward seats in a theater orchestra. In a church or cathedral the stalls are the fixed seats built in rows along the sides of the chancelchancel,
primarily that part of the church close to the altar and used by the officiating clergy. In the early churches it was separated from the nave by a low parapet or open railing (cancellus), its name being thus derived.
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 and used by the clergy and choir. They formed part of the church furniture at an early period when the officiating clergy had increased in number. At first movable seats, they later became an architectural feature. The choir stalls may be arranged in a single tier or in several tiers, one behind another. The prayer rest for each stall is formed by the back of the one preceding it. Each seat folds back to give space for kneeling or standing, and the miserere or projecting corbel upon its under surface then furnishes a rest for the priest in the long periods of standing. In the medieval stalls the miserere was carved with scenes from everyday life or with fabulous animal forms, called misericordsmisericords
, carvings in Gothic churches that adorn choir stalls provided for the use of the clergy during services. The stalls were carved with biblical scenes that demonstrated the artist's skill and wit.
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. From the 14th cent. onward the stalls became objects of the woodcarver's limitless skill, with high, traceried backs and sculptured arms. The uppermost tier was often crowned by high gables or by canopies of richest tabernacle work, supported on colonnettes and terminating in spires. The magnificent stalls (c.1530) in St. George's Chapel, Windsor, assigned to the use of the Knights of the Garter, are of this kind.

Bibliography

See M. D. Anderson, Misericords (1954).

stall

[stȯl]
(aerospace engineering)
The action or behavior of an airplane (or one of its airfoils) when by the separation of the airflow, as in the case of insufficient airspeed or of an excessive angle of attack, the airplane or airfoil tends to drop; the condition existing during this behavior.
A flight performance in which an airplane is made to lose flying speed and to drop by pointing the nose steeply upward.
An act or instance of stalling.

stall

1. A fixed seat enclosed wholly or partially at the back and sides.
2. (Brit.) In the theater, a seat in the front division of the parquet (orchestra stalls).

stall

stall
stall
Airflow over an aerofoil at stalling angle.
An aerodynamic condition in which the flow along the upper surface of the airfoil separates, resulting in a sharp reduction in the quantum of generated lift. An aircraft stalls after it has reached the critical angle of attack. The stalling angle of attack of a wing is fixed, whereas the stalling speed can vary and depends on a number of factors, such as the load factor, weight, aircraft configuration (position of flaps, undercarriage, etc.), bank angle, and power setting.

stall

1. a small often temporary stand or booth for the display and sale of goods
2. in a church
a. one of a row of seats, usually divided from the others by armrests or a small screen, for the use of the choir or clergy
b. a pen
3. an instance of an engine stalling
4. a condition of an aircraft in flight in which a reduction in speed or an increase in the aircraft's angle of attack causes a sudden loss of lift resulting in a downward plunge
5. Brit
a. a seat in a theatre or cinema that resembles a chair, usually fixed to the floor
b. the area of seats on the ground floor of a theatre or cinema nearest to the stage or screen
References in periodicals archive ?
Seven buffaloes out of the ten were kept as stall fed and housed most of the time as reported by owners during anamnesis.
In stall fed cows the first sign is reduced feed intake and if feed is offered in component cow in ketosis often refuse to eat grain followed by complete inappetance, as a result there is an empty appearing of abdomen as seen in case of rabies.
Many cases of laminitis in stall fed dairy cows in and around Guwahati, India have been observed by clinicians but a systematic study and record of the disease is still lacking.