stamen

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stamen,

one of the four basic parts of a flowerflower,
name for the specialized part of a plant containing the reproductive organs, applied to angiosperms only. A flower may be thought of as a modified, short, compact branch bearing lateral appendages.
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. The stamen (microsporophyll), is often called the flower's male reproductive organ. It is typically located between the central pistil and the surrounding petals. A stamen consists of a slender stalk (the filament) tipped by a usually bilobed sac (the anther) in which microspores develop as pollenpollen,
minute grains, usually yellow in color but occasionally white, brown, red, or purple, borne in the anther sac at the tip of the slender filament of the stamen of a flowering plant or in the male cone of a conifer.
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 grains. The number of stamens is a factor in classifying plant families, e.g., there are 5 (or multiples of 5) in the rose family and 10 in the pulse family. In most flowers the stamens are constructed so as to promote cross-pollination and to avoid self-pollination; e.g., they may be longer than the pistil or may be so placed in relation to the pistil (as in the mountain laurel and the lady's-slipper) as to prevent the pollinating insect from transferring the pollen of a flower to its own pistil. There may be differing maturation times for the stigma of the pistil and for the anther. In some plants there are some flowers (staminate) that bear stamens and no pistil and others (pistillate) that have a pistil and no stamens; these flowers may be borne on the same or on separate plants of the same species. In some highly developed flowers, especially double ones, and in some horticultural varieties (e.g., the geranium) the stamen may be modified into a sterile petallike organ.

Stamen

 

the reproductive organ of the flower of angiosperms in which the pollen grains are formed. The stamen is homologous to the microsporophyll. A typical stamen consists of an anther filament, which contains a vascular bundle, and an anther, the symmetrical halves of which are joined by a strand attached to the anther filament. Microspores are formed from the cells of the archesporium after meiosis. In each of the four nidi of the anther (microsporangia), the microspores sprout into male gametophytes—pollen grains. The aggregate of stamens of a flower is called the androecium. The stamens are arranged on the torus spirally (as in many Ranunculaceae) or in circles. Stamens arranged spirally may range from one to numerous; those arranged in a circle usually number from three to ten. Stamens may concresce with the anthers (Compositae), the filaments (legumes), or entirely (some Cucurbitaceae). They sometimes concresce with other parts of the flower, for example, the corolla (many sympetallous plants) or the pistil (some Orchidaceae).

A. N. SLADKOV

stamen

[′stā·mən]
(botany)
The male reproductive structure of a flower, consisting of an anther and a filament.

stamen

the male reproductive organ of a flower, consisting of a stalk (filament) bearing an anther in which pollen is produced
References in periodicals archive ?
The staminate inflorescences are large, showy, loose, axillary, cymose panicles (thyrses), while the pistillate ones are small, obscure, congested, axillary, spicate cymes.
Spikelets with 3-10+ scales, the lower 2-4 scale empty, the lower fertile scale pistillate, the remaining fertile scales staminate or empty; floral scales ovate-deltoid to ovate-lanceolate.
Lateral spikes, type of flower subtended by proximal-most scale: pistillate (0), staminate or none (1) 22.
These have coriaceous leaves with lepidote scales, and their staminate flowers are greatly reduced compared to Croton (four to six per flower with no filaments, vs.
A reinterpretation of the staminate flowers of Haptanthus.
The plant produces inconspicuous, bisexual or staminate, sessile flowers with undifferentiated perianth along a branched, terminal, pubescent inflorescence (Fig.
The flowers of the vast majority of Ericaceae are perfect, having apparently functional staminate and pistillate parts.
Staminate floral development in Begonia cucullata var.
Ontogeny of staminate and carpellate flowers of Schisandra glabra (Schisandra).
Staminate and pistillate platanaceous flowers from the Late Cretaceous (Coniacian-Santonian) of Georgia, U.