standard atmosphere


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Related to standard atmosphere: Standard atmospheric pressure

standard atmosphere

[′stan·dərd ′at·mə‚sfir]
(meteorology)
A hypothetical vertical distribution of atmospheric temperature, pressure, and density which is taken to be representative of the atmosphere for purposes of pressure altimeter calibrations, aircraft performance calculations, aircraft and missile design, and ballistic tables; the air is assumed to obey the perfect gas law and hydrostatic equation, which, taken together, relate temperature, pressure, and density variations in the vertical; it is further assumed that the air contains no water vapor, and that the acceleration of gravity does not change with height.
(physics)

standard atmosphere

A pressure equivalent to 14.7 lb per sq in. (1.01 × 106 dynes per sq cm).
References in periodicals archive ?
It is because that the cumulative effect of split error increases with the range increasing in a standard atmosphere. Comparing Figure 3(a) to Figure 3(b), the difference of transmission loss is greater inside the duct, especially nearby the ocean.
Therefore, a particularly simple inverse relationship exists, [[rho].sub.eq] [varies] 1/[g.sub.s], allowing translation of the surface gravity of an isoatmospheric planet to the Earth-equivalent air density (and hence also equivalent maximum flight altitude via the International Standard Atmosphere).
Gyatt, "The Standard Atmosphere," A mathematical model of the 1976 U.S.
The vertical gradient of the radio refractivity was lower than the value, which was recommended by ITU-R (for standard atmosphere).
Standard Atmosphere 1976 document (NOAA/NASA 1976) used the 9340 [[mu]mol.[mol.sup.-1]] value.
The standard temperature is the freezing point of water and the standard pressure is one standard atmosphere.
The coefficients for the Niell's functions (Niell, 1996) were obtained empirically using US Standard Atmosphere 1966 data while for the Isobaric Mapping Functions (IMF)--using NCEP (National Center for Environmental Prediction) numerical meteorological model (Niell, 2001).
The important thing to remember, however, is that this relationship is an estimate based on a model called the International Standard Atmosphere (ISA)--and this model is not always accurate.

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