standard candle


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standard candle

See distance determination.

standard candle

[′stan·dərd ′kand·əl]
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"Until very recently, the leading model for standard candle supernovae was thought to include a companion star from which material was stripped by the white dwarf until the accumulated mass could no longer be sustained by the outwards pressure, leading to a runaway thermonuclear explosion.
In reality, the Hubble Law coincides fairly well with standard candle observations until d approaches [R.sub.u], where it then becomes non-linear and produces a result that mimics acceleration of the viewed object, if one still believes that Hubble's Law is linear.
Type Ia supernovae, nature's own "standard candles," have been used for many years by astronomers to measure cosmological distances.
Red clump giant stars were chosen for this study as they can be used as a standard candle: at this stage in the star's lifetime their luminosity is approximately independent of their age or composition.
Traditionally, astronomers have exploited the standard candle potential of a particular class of stars known as Cepheid variables.
Said another way, a standard candle at a given redshift would appear brighter in a slowing universe than in a continually expanding one.
For example, engineers need a way to precisely calibrate light sensors, and Gorshkov says the findings could make it far easier to create a "standard candle" that shines a precise number of photons at a detector.
Candlepower is the luminous intensity of lamp or luminaire expressed in candles--a standard candle being the unit of luminous intensity.
Radiation from the Crab nebula supernova remnant is believed to be so constant that astronomers use it as a standard candle with which to measure the energetic radiation of other astronomical sources.
Candlepower is the luminous intensity of lamp or luminaire expressed in candles --a standard candle being the unit of luminous intensity.
First, they observed a type of "standard candle"--stars known as Cepheid variables--to find the distance to the spiral galaxy M96 in the Leo cluster of galaxies.
Most strategies for measuring distance require some kind of "standard candle," the celestial equivalent of a lightbulb of known wattage.

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