standardized mortality ratio

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standardized mortality ratio

a way of calculating death rates in terms of the average for the group or population and then determining the degree to which local populations vary from that standard. For example, 100 is the number given to the average death rate for the UK and areas with SMRs of less than 100 have better life chances than areas where the SMR is above 100. See also OFFICIAL STATISTICS, DEATH RATE.
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But when adjusted to take into account a patient's risk of death, its "standardised mortality ratio" of 0.93% suggested there were marginally fewer deaths than predicted.
The surgery switch began in February 2014, months after the Trust used controversial Hospital Standardised Mortality Ratio (HSMR) figures to highlight death rate concerns at the Alex, which were also backed by an internal report.
These figures are taken from the first publication of the Hospital Standardised Mortality Ratio (HSMR) figures using new methodology which looks at progress towards the new aim of a 10% reduction in hospital mortality by December 2018 compared to the quarter January to March 2014.
Coding also affects a hospital's recorded death rate, also known as the hospital standardised mortality ratio (HSMR).
A 'standardised mortality ratio' is used to identify blackspots, where a figure of 100 would be the expected number of deaths, given the age of the population.
A 'standardised mortality ratio' (SMR) is used to identify blackspots, where a figure of 100 would be the expected number of deaths, given the age of the population.
He also said there are improvements in the other measurement of mortality, the Hospital Standardised Mortality Ratio.
Nine of the trusts have been "outliers" on the Hospital Standardised Mortality Ratio (HSMR) for two years running and the other five were identified by the Summary Hospital-level Mortality Indicator (SHMI) as having higher than expected death rates.
Nine of the trusts have been 'outliers' on the Hospital Standardised Mortality Ratio (HSMR) for two years running and the other five were identified by the Summary Hospital-level Mortality Indicator (SHMI) as having higher than expected death rates.
The Royal and Broadgreen hospitals fell within average rates in three of the categories, and below average in one, known as the Hospital Standardised Mortality Ratio (HSMR), with a rate of 92.
The review of deaths showed that in the poorest section of society, the standardised mortality ratio had increased from 138.1 in 1921-30 to 148.9 between 1999 and 2007.
The hospital standardised mortality ratio is used to measure the quality and safety of hospital care in the UK.