stándestaat

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stándestaat

a postfeudal form of the STATE in some parts of Western Europe (e.g. France, Prussia) in which the broad ESTATES of the realm (e.g. nobility, burghers) possessed rights to be consulted by the ruler in affairs of state. The meetings of the states-general in France at the start of the 1789 Revolution were assemblies of representatives of estates. The existence of such groups, for which there exist no direct parallels outside Europe, has sometimes been seen as an important factor in the distinctive ‘democratic’, ‘participatory’ route taken by European politics.
References in periodicals archive ?
Alli publico la revista Der christliche Standestaat, uno de los principales foros intelectuales de oposicion al nazismo.
Unwilling to live in Germany under the Nazis, Hildebrand moved in 1933 first to Italy and then to Austria, "where he continued teaching philosophy (now at the University of Vienna) and fought the Nazis with even greater vigor, founding and then publishing for a number of years a prominent anti-Nazi newspaper, Der Christliche Standestaat" ("Biographical Note" 1990, 108).
Parecia que Morelos, por un lado reformador social, era, por el otro, clerical tradicional, y al tiempo que queria suprimir un aspecto integral del antiguo regimen colonial, intentaba fortalecer otro, es decir, el estatus de la Iglesia y sus ministros como una de las corporaciones privilegiadas de la estructura juridica del tipico Standestaat. (2)
La exaltacion de un Estado-poder (Machtstaat), frente al Estado estamental (Standestaat) defendido por los conservadores o el Estado legal (Rechtsstaat) de los liberales, fue el rasgo cardinal de esta concepcion politica.
Despite these diversities a recurrent although somewhat nebulous ideal can be perceived permeating the works of all these writers--that of an "organically constituted" Standestaat. The standische Idee in German political and social theory has always been closely bound up with an "organic" conception of state and society which elaborates upon the more or less explicit assumption that valid comparisons can be made between a living body and a politically organized community.
They further traced this newfangled regime back to the liberal bourgeoisie, which had wrested power from an older government run by social estates (Standestaat).
Portugal was a society of "estates" (standestaat), with differing systems of property transmission for nobles and commoners, differences that Brazil maintained until 1847.
Hilde Haider-Pregler's essay 'Exilland Osterreich' evokes all the ambiguities of exile in the Standestaat, where actors of the stature of Basserman and Wallburg were welcomed on the Viennese stage, but less-known colleagues were excluded.
His political thought, based as it is on a society of estates that has not existed for hundreds of years, might well have gone to o blivion with the Standestaat. As Thomas Hueglin ably explains, however, Althusius's work is actually quite relevant to our world of declining national sovereignty, globalization, and increasing interest in politics on the subnational and transnational levels.
Generally, the aim of this commentary is to make clear that Hegel reacted against the destruction of traditional society around 1800, that is, the destruction of metaphysics and religion in the Standestaat. The autonomy of consciousness and of conscience, as well as the citizen's private life and the freedom of subjectivity are seen by Hegel as a necessary result of world history.
Anthony Bushell's concise and informative introduction outlines post-war Austria's complex heritages: Habsburg Empire; First Republic; Austro-Fascist 'Standestaat'; National Socialism; the Allies' Moscow Declaration of 1943 describing Austria as Nazism's first victim (a view to which can be traced both the triumph of the 'Staatsvertrag' of 1955 and the lasting individual and collective amnesia the Waldheim controversy notoriously exemplified).
Staniszkis does not view the new East European states as functioning democracies but, rather, as Standestaat ("estates' states," a term used to depict late feudal Germany) characterized by the political domination of several distinctive groups (estates) with separate sets of rules but no clearly definable constituencies or economic interests.