standing order


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standing order

a rule or order governing the procedure, conduct, etc., of a legislative body
References in periodicals archive ?
Second, CAP "strongly disagrees" with HCFA's assertion that standing orders reflect insufficient exercise of medical judgment.
Standing Order 69(a) should be amended to read: Private Members' Public Bills may be co-sponsored by up to four members of the House.
These include utility payments through direct debit, standing orders, inward money transfers, issuance of standard cheque books, QNB debit cards, ATM withdrawals within Qatar, as well as all many telephonic and website transaction, as well as QNB SMS alerts and account activity updates.
I asked them to put my standing order payment down and put pounds 79.
It adds that 40% of couples save by standing order, 35% have seen their savings increase over the last six months - albeit, like single people, 26% have seen them decrease - and couples are likely to dip into their savings only once or twice a year.
And most current accounts service numerous standing orders and direct debits.
Total quantity or scope: For lot 1 monographs, collections and suites standing order published in Hispanic Latin America
When it invoked Standing Order 53 on September 16, 1991, the government stated that a maximum of one day of debate would be allocated to each of second reading, Committee of the Whole and third reading for back-to-work legislation for the public sector.
Their standing orders apparently give them the power to prevent reporters using Twitter to keep the public informed of what is going on there, but it is odd that they choose to use those powers in this way.
Industry body Apacs said the new system, which will enable payments made by telephone, online and through standing orders to arrive on the day they are made, should be up and running by the end of May.
They each imposed a pounds 118 penalty, including charges for a cheque, direct debit and standing order which was paid out while the customer was over their limit.
A customer going into the red without permission could be charged pounds 94 if a cheque, direct debit and standing order were all refused by their bank - according to website MoneyExpert.

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