Star Sapphire

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star sapphire

[′stär ′sa‚fīr]
(mineralogy)
A variety of sapphire exhibiting a six-pointed star resulting from the presence of microscopic crystals in various orientations within the gemstone.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
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Green Lantern vol. 2 #16 © 1962 DC Comics. COVER ART BY GIL KANE AND MURPHY ANDERSON.

Star Sapphire

(pop culture)
The illustrious Star Sapphire has had a sparkling career as one of the DC Universe's most menacing supervixens. She was introduced in comics' Golden Age (1938–1954), in a story in All-Flash #32 (1948), as a fish-netted, purple-clad exiled queen of the female warrior race the Zamarons. This original Star Sapphire journeyed to Earth to rule it, and in the process battled the original Flash. More than a decade later, in the pages of Green Lantern vol. 2 #16 (1962), scripted by John Broome and rendered by Gil Kane, the ultra-feminist Zamarons selected career woman Carol Ferris, girlfriend of Hal (Green Lantern) Jordan, as their new ruler, Star Sapphire (sometimes historically referred to as Star Sapphire II). (The original Star Sapphire attempted to eliminate her new rival, but was defeated by the Flashes [Jay Garrick and Barry Allen] and Green Lanterns [Alan Scott and Hal Jordan] of two generations. She disappeared into the Zamarons' 7th Dimension, and has not been seen since.) Clad in a magenta leotard with matching go-go boots and eyemask and a star emblem on her midriff, Star Sapphire—whose primary weapon, the Green Lantern power ring–like star sapphire gem, allows her to fly and can hurl large blasts of energy—actually defeated the Emerald Crusader in their first meeting. Over much of the Silver Age (1956–1969), Ferris would fall under the Zamarons' hypnotic spell, with Star Sapphire taking control of her form, the supervillainess identity unknown to Ferris. During the mid- to late 1970s she was frequently seen as a member of the Secret Society of Super-Villains. Over the years, Star Sapphire has endured bouts of emotional crisis, split-personality, and the horror of morphing into a male being called the Predator. In the 2005 “Crisis of Conscience” storyline in JLA, Star Sapphire hooked up with her old cronies in the Secret Society of Super-Villains for a full-scale assault against the Justice League of America. The character has appeared on Cartoon Network's Justice League (2001–2004), voiced by Olivia d'Abo, in which her streamlined, high-fashion style—designed by superstar artist Bruce Timm—respectfully nods to Kane's original design for the character in the Silver Age Green Lantern comics, while contemporizing her for a modern viewership.
The Supervillain Book: The Evil Side of Comics and Hollywood © 2006 Visible Ink Press®. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
The gemmological properties of black star sapphires from Australia and Thailand most closely resemble those of the Gold Sheen sapphire, including the high Fe content, lack of UV fluorescence, healed fractures and polysynthetic twinning.
Black star sapphires may contain similar oriented assemblages of exsolved Fe-Ti oxides.
In April 2015, a client submitted a bright blue star sapphire weighing 13.69 ct and measuring 13.85 x 11.89 x 10.28 mm (Figure 28).
This brilliant six-point star sapphire, among the largest in the world, is on display in the ROM's Samuel European Galleries.
Gem News International: Enamel-backed quartz as a star sapphire imitation.