star stream

(redirected from star streams)
Also found in: Dictionary.

star stream

[′stär ′strēm]
(astronomy)
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
The newfound star streams "are clearly another indicator that our model of hierarchical structure formation--big galaxies growing by eating smaller ones--is going in the right direction" says Johnston.
Separately, Grillmair and Odysseas Dionatos of the Astronomical Observatory in Rome found a second star stream, nicknamed the galactic highway, which is 30,000 light-years from Earth.
Zucker of the Max Planck Institute for Astronomy in Heidelberg, Germany, reports that it has found what looks like another star stream near Andromeda.
Because star streams are both faint and stretched out, only a sensitive light detector that views a large area of sky can observe them.
The stars and star streams found in the Milky Way's halo are deficient in elements heavier than helium, an indication that they originated from the metal-poor, first generation of stars in the cosmos.
The astronomers would expect, in accordance with observations of star streams in the Milky Way, to find a similar star stream on the northern side of Andromeda's halo.
At the same time, astronomers keep finding ever more "star streams" of disrupted dwarf galaxies that have fallen into the Milky Way recently enough in cosmic history that they have not yet fully come apart.
To find such star streams, we need highly accurate locations, brightnesses, and colors for faint stars over vast areas of sky--exactly the sort of data the SDSS is obtaining.
The first, called SEGUE (Sloan Extension for Galactic Underpinnings and Evolution), will extend our studies of our galaxy's structure by imaging closer to the plane of the Milky Way and taking stellar spectra to find and study new star streams. The second will use the SDSS imaging camera to repeatedly image a region of sky 2 1/2 [degrees] wide and 90[degrees] long in search of variable objects, particularly supernovae.
SDSS astronomers have discovered a star stream that appears to wrap completely around the Milky Way.
Computer simulations suggest that diffuse star streams lost by the Canis Major dwarf in the last billion years currently loop around the Milky Way several times.