Stark

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Stark

1. Dame Freya (Madeline) . 1893--1993, British traveller and writer, whose many books include The Southern Gates of Arabia (1936), Beyond Euphrates (1951), and The Journey's Echo (1963)
2. Johannes . 1874--1957, German physicist, who discovered the splitting of the lines of a spectrum when the source of light is subjected to a strong electrostatic field (Stark effect, 1913): Nobel prize for physics 1919
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
"The consequence of that is make it the choices starker and starker.
In 1962, Secretary of the Interior Stewart Udall tasked Starker Leopold with addressing the issue of wildlife population control in national parks.
Michael Starker is a senior project architect with 25 plus years experience.
"Some suggested that in Apple's next mobile operating system, Ive is pushing a more "flat design" that is starker and simpler, according to developers who have spoken to Apple employees but didn't have further details.
Young drivers, and older ones too, can have no starker illustration of how careful they must always be.
Joyce Geeting; JANOS STARKER KING OF CELLISTS: THE MAKING OF AN ARTIST; Chamber Music Plus Publishing (Biographies and Memoirs) $24.95 ISBN: 9780975473405
The figures are even starker among people living in Scotland, with 28 per cent cancelling or not renewing their contents cover and 21 per cent giving up buildings insurance.
Janos Starker; "king of cellists." (audio CD included)
A legendary figure in the music world, Janos Starker was so gifted a cellist that at the age of twelve he was teaching five students to play the instrument.
But it was not until Mauro Bigonzetti tapped her for his Diamond Project premiere In Vento, that Reichlen discovered a starker, stronger quality in herself.
Janos Starker, cello; Stanislaw Skrowaczewski and Antal Dorati, London Symphony Orchestra.
(Klein himself "emptied" a room at his Krefeld, Germany, retrospective in 1961, but any attempt to duplicate that already rather pathetic duplication would look only more fraudulent.) The next section covered the full range of "Anthropometries," including a large and fussy vertical Untitled of 1960 (number 101 in Paul Wember's 1969 catalogue), replete with negative imprints of tree leaves between positive blue and gold imprints of female bodies; an even larger and starker Untitled of the same year (number 106), in which eight distinct imprints of female nudes are disposed in a friezelike fashion, as in some of Matisse's later paper cutouts; and The Grand Blue Anthropometry, also from 1960, in which the furious traces left by Klein's "living brushes" amount to unidentifiable tachist blobs.