Stark

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Stark

1. Dame Freya (Madeline) . 1893--1993, British traveller and writer, whose many books include The Southern Gates of Arabia (1936), Beyond Euphrates (1951), and The Journey's Echo (1963)
2. Johannes . 1874--1957, German physicist, who discovered the splitting of the lines of a spectrum when the source of light is subjected to a strong electrostatic field (Stark effect, 1913): Nobel prize for physics 1919
References in periodicals archive ?
Whilst not recommending the demolishing of the Heritage Centre I would suggest if by some means the white starkness could be toned down a more harmonious view could be obtained.
The Hurriyet leaders said, "The brazenness and starkness of India's aggressive colonial approach towards the people of Kashmir becomes more and more evident by the day."
Some retain the traditional starkness of fairy tales.
However, the very starkness of the novel is another point in its favor.
One young artist said, "I think peace is being kind." Another added, "We like the black and white starkness of our flowers as a symbol of peace and balance of harmony." A participant added, "I want to draw peace signs with my friends." They repeated the words of the ICAF Chairman Dr.
The Minimal Nativity has a similar starkness and ability to shock.
Indeed, its very starkness glows as a kind of purity that the Madonna stands for.
It shows the crime from different angles and in a more thought-provoking manner than it would come across in the starkness of a courtroom.
THERE'S a time for thinking, remembering and wishing, A time for longing, regretting and simply forgetting, And as you wake, yawn, and fumble with the blinds, The image fade, as dreams become shadowy signs, You start your day, cope with the problems of work, And as it wanes you yawn again, there's no more talk, Reaching your street, behind your door is darkness, Turn the key, lights and music relieves the starkness, TV, newspaper, magazine, hi-fi as company, You eat, and as midnight calls you have your bevy, Struggling to sleep while the mind is reminiscing, The time we had for ourselves, sadly now is missing, There's a time, there always is that hurts, won't go away, That time was mine.
While there is a lot of hands in air or out in front (somewhat zombielike) this stylised chorus choreography mirrored the starkness of the designs, a simple blue wall for the Hebrews (also dressed and made up in blue and green) - redolent of the Wailing Wall - and a red wall for the Egyptians (similarly coloured red and ochre), bleachers and a large table.
Once the story is laid out, you'll marvel at the starkness of it all the settings, the ground rules and the minimal number of characters that take the plot forward.
We are up on top of the castle hill with no vast copper beech as a backdrop, only the dramatic starkness of the keep and the constant roar of the M6 in the background.