static random-access memory


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static random-access memory

[′stad·ik ′rand·əm ¦ak‚ses ′mem·rē]
(computer science)
A read-write random-access memory that uses either four transistors and two resistors to form a passive-load flip-flop, or six transistors to form a flip-flop with dynamic loads, for each cell in an array. Once data are loaded into the flip-flop storage elements, the flip-flop will indefinitely remain in that state until the information is intentionally changed or the power to the memory circuit is shut off. Abbreviated SRAM.

static random-access memory

(storage)
(SRAM) Random-access memory in which each bit of storage is a bistable flip-flop, commonly consisting of cross-coupled inverters. It is called "static" because it will retain a value as long as power is supplied, unlike dynamic random-access memory (DRAM) which must be regularly refreshed. It is however, still volatile, i.e. it will lose its contents when the power is switched off, in contrast to ROM.

SRAM is usually faster than DRAM but since each bit requires several transistors (about six) you can get less bits of SRAM in the same area. It usually costs more per bit than DRAM and so is used for the most speed-critical parts of a computer (e.g. cache memory) or other circuit.
References in periodicals archive ?
PolarFire FPGAs offer 30 to 50 percent lower total power over competing Static Random-Access Memory (SRAM)-based mid-range FPGAs.
The company states that: "Since 2014, Samsung has processed close to 200,000 wafers with EUV lithography technology and, building on its experience, has recently seen visible results in process development such as achieving 80 percent yield for 256 megabit (Mb) SRAM (static random-access memory)."