static wick

static wick

A device for discharging into the air static electricity accumulated on aircraft control surfaces. It is made up of hundreds of cotton fibers impregnated with graphite. A flexible wick projects behind the trailing edges of the control surfaces and discharges electricity through these fibers. See static discharge.
An Illustrated Dictionary of Aviation Copyright © 2005 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved
References in periodicals archive ?
Leave a 7-in long opening 5 inches from the corner on the trailing edge to allow an opening for the static wick.
That sealant is required each time a technician removes and replaces an antenna or static wick mount.
I read with interest the static wick article in the July 2016 issue of Aviation Consumer.
Static wicks dissipate precipitation static from the aircraft's extremities to prevent these discharges.
It is dissipated out safely through points that have static wicks [antenna-like devices on wingtips] and so on, things that help the electricity flow around the aircraft and back out to the atmosphere."
It did not adhere to the airframe, and it did not adversely affect visibility, but it started creating a little static in the radios, so I knew the static wicks on the airplane were well past their prime.
It was during this period that the static wicks seen on aircraft today were developed.
It may cause precipitation static if your static wicks are worn out.
The airplane wasn't equipped with static wicks, so when a charge built up, it had no place to go until it naturally discharged with a pop.
Postflight inspection revealed that electrostatic discharge from the canopy had fried the radios because of a shortage of static wicks on the aircraft.