stationary population

stationary population

[′stā·shə‚ner·ē ‚päp·yə′lā·shən]
(ecology)
A population containing a basically even distribution of age groups.
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Such a high rate of increase coupled with high IMR doesn't support the major part of population to reach 65 years of age (this proportion in Pakistan being 4%) and it might require more than 20 years to achieve a stable or stationary population structure which is attained when TFR becomes 2.3 (still 3.8 in Pakistan) while most of the countries, except Philippines (2.9), have already witnessed this level.
This is a result of the stationary population percent distribution [??] eventually being reached.
One of them is the fact that the first tool uses a single stationary population of 2000 random numbers.
If 2 bacterial colonizations occur independently in a stationary population, the prevalence of co-colonization will be the product (multiplication) of each prevalence, and the OR between 2 bacterial colonizations in the population ([OR.sub.pop]) will be 1 (online Technical Appendix, wwwnc.cdc.gov/EID/article/20/2/121724-Techapp1.pdf).
The only way to maintain a stable stationary population with a youthful age structure is to return to the demography of the past where many children were born and most people died young.
Model of a stationary population: age structure and life expectancy
Age structures of captured individuals did not vary (P [greater than] 0.05) among years, and population estimates did not differ among years; therefore, we constructed a life table under the assumption of a stationary population (r = 0.0).
A stationary population is an artificial construct used in demographic studies to simulate the longitudinal behavior of individuals.
Fitness is equated with lifetime reproductive output, which implies a stationary population.
Chapter 5's description of stationary population theory is similar to that in Bowers et al.
His attempt to apply an expectation of life formula to collection management is not unlaudable in itself, but he looked at average life expectancy in a stationary population. The great variation between items makes averages quite useless, while in no library in the world, except a dead one, is the book population stationary.
The problem of how mean population densities respond to environmental trends requires calculating the change in the stationary population distribution resulting from changes in the distribution of u(t).