Statute of limitations


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Statute of limitations

A statute specifying the period of time within which legal action must be brought for alleged damages or injury; in construction industry cases.

statute of limitations

A statute specifying the period of time within which legal action must be brought for alleged damage or injury. The lengths of the periods vary from state to state and depend upon the type of legal action. The period commences to run under some statutes of limitations upon the accrual of a legal claim, but in others only upon the time of discovery of the act resulting in the alleged damage or injury.
References in periodicals archive ?
C [section] 666 are restricted by the standard statute of limitations for federal crimes, 18 U.
In one respect, Oregon law already accounts for the possibility of fresh evidence in rape cases: The statute of limitations is waived if DNA evidence identifies a rape suspect.
33) These included a new statute of limitations, which replaced the old five-year period found in the Public Disclosure Act.
85) For continuing offenses, the statute of limitations does not begin to run when the perpetrator has satisfied each of the elements of the offense.
The statute of limitations in the case against Euzal's death expires on April 17.
After three years of litigation, the trial court granted summary judgment in favor of the appraiser defendants, and ruled that the statute of limitations had expired on the bank's negligence claim.
The statute of limitations usually requires all malpractice lawsuits to be filed with in 2 years of the negligent act.
The court held that only one statute of limitations per state applies--in this instance, Washington's six-year statute of limitations for written contract claims--and it begins to accrue upon receipt of the final-appeal denial letter, after the claimant has exhausted all administrative remedies.
In July next year, the statute of limitations will run out on an unsolved robbery-murder case that occurred in a supermarket in the western Tokyo city of Hachioji in 1995.
The hospital filed a motion for summary judgment based on the fact that Kentucky's two year statute of limitations had run.
The second circumstance under which a statute of limitations would apply in a private arbitration is where a statute of limitation's application is implicit in the statutory language.
The country has a statute of limitations, which means prosecutors have exactly 15 years to convict murder suspects.