steerage


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steerage

1. the cheapest accommodation on a passenger ship, originally the compartments containing the steering apparatus
2. an instance or the practice of steering and the effect of this on a vessel or vehicle

steerage

[′stir·ij]
(naval architecture)
The least desirable portions of a vessel used for accommodations for passengers who pay the lowest fare.
References in periodicals archive ?
The propulsion system works in conjunction with the zero drag steerage system (ZDSS), which, according to McCall was the biggest engineering challenge.
YESTERDAY'S SOLUTIONS WEE THINKER ACROSS: 7 Epigram 9 Reams 10 Tosca 11 Tadpole 12 Emu 13 Steerage 16 Division 17 Vat 19 Michael 21 Moral 22 Local 23Winsome.
We live on an ark...the people in the first class cabins will not long remain impervious to the impact on poorer people in steerage; it's just one world which we inhabit".
In its heyday, the 288-foot "palace steamer" was the second-largest steamship on the Great Lakes and featured posh accommodations for the wealthy, along with steerage for immigrants and freight.
The show, which has a score by Maury Yeston and a book by Peter Stone, focuses on the vessel's passengers in first-class, second-class and steerage.
Were the steerage passengers locked below decks?" they said.
Another question that's come up is whether an exchange should care about "steerage" -- intentional or unintentional efforts by brokers to steer consumers toward or away from certain plans -- and, if so, how an exchange should try to prevent steerage.
And below the waterline in steerage is Julie Vernet of Le Havre, France.
The ship's three doctors were each assigned a post of duty and all her public rooms and officers' cabins, including that of the captain, were given up to Titanic survivors, while all of Carpathia's steerage passengers were placed in one section of third class so that vacant berths could be given to people from Titanic's steerage.
As a pundit he might speak from experience with greater knowledge than we mere hacks but he is still in the same boat, albeit first class rather than steerage.
Through the explorations of Thomas into both steerage and first class the reader is given what appears to be an accurate picture of the layout of the Titanic, the class-conscious attitudes of the passengers and the prevailing mores, although the dialogue is at times stilted and formalised.