steganography

(redirected from stego)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus.

steganography

[‚steg·ə′näg·rə·fē]
(computer science)
The art and science of hiding a message in a medium, such as a digital picture or audio file, so as to defy detection.

steganography

(security)
Hiding a secret message within a larger one in such a way that others can not discern the presence or contents of the hidden message. For example, a message might be hidden within an image by changing the least significant bits to be the message bits.

[Chaffing and Winnowing: Confidentiality without Encryption, Ronald L. Rivest, MIT Lab for Computer Science, 1998-03-22].

steganography

Hiding a message within an image, audio or video file. Used as an alternate to encryption, it takes advantage of unused bits within the file structure or bits that are mostly undetectable if altered. A steganographic message rides secretly to its destination, unlike encrypted messages, which although undecipherable without the decryption key, can be identified as encrypted. For a white paper on the subject written by Neil F. Johnson of George Mason University, visit www.jjtc.com/Steganography. See ScramDisk and social steganography.
References in periodicals archive ?
For convenience, we used stego images (a), (b), and (c) to reconstruct the secret image.
From table 3 we can see that there are a little differences between the histogram of cover and stego image.
Multi-level IDWT: the IDWT transform is applied to the coefficients of the stego signal.
Repeat Steps 1-5 until all secret bits are embedded and the stego image is produced.
Concrete announced an agreement in April whereby San Clemente, Calif.-based Stego Industries LLC, a key player in below-slab vapor barriers, becomes exclusive channel partner to market and sell Aridus Rapid Drying Concrete.
Imperceptibility (or fidelity) is referred to the perceptual difference between the stego and original image and can be tested subjectively.
Using a stego key it can be used for encryption of the hidden message and/or for randomization in the stego system.
Steganography--the hiding of digital files within other files--is becoming more common thanks to software programs easily available for purchase and download, such as Covert.tcp and Stego. The technology itself is harmless and can actually be a force for good.
Even in more usual locations (southern Wyoming, Utah, and Colorado), only a half-dozen stego skeletons had ever been found (compared with 28 T.
WetStone Technologies' Stego Watch (WetStone Technologies 2004) analyzes a set of files and provides a probability about which are steganography media and the likely algorithm used for the hiding (which, in turn, provides clues as to the most likely software employed).
A common "stego" method employs the slight distortion of a sequence of pixels, which are individual dots of color.