stellar photometry

stellar photometry

[′stel·ər phə′täm·ə·trē]
(astronomy)
The measurement of the brightness of stars.
References in periodicals archive ?
Stellar photometry has never been done before on this scale or with this accuracy.
He had started work on stellar photometry while still at West Kirby and during this time he helped to found the Liverpool Astronomical Society.
Significantly, several major visual-astronomy projects of the 1880s, involving stellar photometry, spectral classification, and the structure of diffuse nebulae, all failed to produce substantive results.
When Edward was appointed director of Harvard College Observatory in 1883, he hired William to assist with his pioneering work on stellar photometry and spectroscopy, naming him assistant professor of astronomy in 1887.
He thoroughly enjoys what he does, which is specifically and unfalteringly stellar photometry. Fried is a preeminent member of the Center for Backyard Astrophysics (CBA).
A 10-inch telescope can now routinely carry out stellar photometry to 17th magnitude, which means many research programs traditionally done by professional astronomers can now be delegated to amateurs using their own equipment.
This feature is not currently implemented in our operating program because we use relatively short exposure times for stellar photometry.
The Measurement of Starlight is a well-written and lively history of stellar photometry. The text is most appropriate for professional astronomers with a historical bent.
Except for two years when it was closed because of the war, professional astronomers made continuous observations using its two 20-centimeter solar telescopes for hydrogen-alpha and white-light studies and its 65-cm Cassegrain for stellar photometry. A 1-meter telescope donated by Austria will be installed at Hvar by the end of this year.
With photoreceptor passbands similar to the B, V, R, and I standards of stellar photometry, the Sidereal Eye would color-code stellar spectral type: 6 and B stars would look violet, A blue, F blue-green, G green, K yellow, early M orange, and late M red.
With peacetime, Ford moved to Connecticut and decided not to finish his Ph.D., opting instead to join the Hartford Symphony Orchestra and participate in a stellar photometry project at Wesleyan Observatory.