stellar rotation


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stellar rotation

[′stel·ər rō′tā·shən]
(astronomy)
Axial rotation of stars; surface rotational equatorial velocities of stars range from a few to 500 kilometers per second.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Just over a decade later, the White Sox won the World Series behind a stellar rotation of Mark Buehrle, Jose Contreras, Freddy Garcia and Jon Garland.
Figure 3 indicates that the observed stellar rotation profile in this sample galaxy (figure 2) will be correctly produced by the Bessel function model FAC if its internal charge density varies with r as
"The key there and what I've told them is, `Don't be satisfied, we can go do this,'" said Peters, who draws confidence on having his starting pitching - a stellar rotation of Bryan Perez, Kyle Brenner, Boyd and Steve Flynn - all on full rest.
Abstract: In a classic 1972 paper, Andrew Skumanich showed that stellar rotation decreases over time--as does chromospheric activity, a proxy for magnetic field strength.
He further pointed out that stellar rotation broadens spectral lines due to the divergent Doppler shifting of light from opposite limbs of the star.
Among several of these stars, magnetically regulated emissions from calcium atoms wax and wane in sync with stellar rotation, says Neugebauer.
"The Pleiades star cluster provides an anchor for theoretical models of stellar rotation going both directions, younger and older," Rebull said in the statement.
If a relationship between stellar rotation and age can be established by studying stars in clusters, then measuring the rotation period of any star can be used to derive its age -- a technique called gyrochronology (pronounced ji-ro-kron-o-lo-gee).
Another way starspots can be inferred is from stellar rotation. If an active star has spots on it, its light level will change subtly as it rotates.
Strong magnetic fields are often associated with rapid stellar rotation. Grindlay speculates that in the crowded environment of a globular cluster, close encounters between neighboring stars may boost stellar rotation rates, generating large magnetic fields.
Since 1980 the HK Project has made observations almost nightly of flux changes that reveal stellar rotation. Wilson's program has been extended to giant stars, as well as to a large census of solar-neighborhood stars.
"Tidal forces transport angular momentum from the stellar rotations to the orbits.