stellar spectroscopy

stellar spectroscopy

[′stel·ər spek′träs·kə·pē]
(astronomy)
The techniques of obtaining spectra of stars and their study.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
With high-resolution stellar spectroscopy, we can obtain each star's precise chemical "fingerprint." Thus the makeup of a dwarf's stars can record even a single major event that impacted an ultra-faint galaxy's history, such as a supernova.
Since we only observed for a fraction of the night with the 8.2-meter Subaru Telescope, there is huge potential for stellar spectroscopy with extremely large telescopes, e.g., the Thirty Meter Telescope, being planned for the future.
Dai Wensai born; a Chinese astronomer; Director of the astronomy department of Nanjing University; worked on stellar spectroscopy, stellar astronomy and the origin of the solar system.
This study can be considered a natural sequel to his 1986 The Analysis of Starlight, which discusses the history of stellar spectroscopy but mentions only briefly the history of the instruments used.
The source gave us a lesson in stellar spectroscopy, sweeping through the classes from F (at about 7000 kelvin, when the heated side was in view) to M (at less than 3000 K, when seen from the back) in only two hours.
An obvious example here which seems to be surprisingly little exploited in current astronomical public outreach is stellar spectroscopy, to the visual presentation of which the light-grasp of the 30" will be handsomely suited.
Getting precious photons onto the CCD is the prime objective of stellar spectroscopy. Light can be dispersed into a spectrum with a prism or diffraction grating, and each method has pros and cons.
Gray, whose book on stellar spectroscopy has guided a generation of students, is well known for measuring very subtle changes in the shapes of spectral lines.