stellar temperature

stellar temperature

See surface temperature.
Collins Dictionary of Astronomy © Market House Books Ltd, 2006

stellar temperature

[′stel·ər ′tem·prə·chər]
(astrophysics)
Any temperature above several million degrees, such as occurs naturally in the interior of the sun and other stars.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Star color is an indicator of stellar temperature. The spectral sequence is the result of temperatures that range from a high of around 50,000[degrees] Kelvin for the hottest O stars to about 2,000[degrees] K at the end of M.
With more certain stellar temperatures and distances, the new observations are more suited to exploring this question.
In arbitrarily selecting mean molecular weights [96,97], Eddington determined the mean central stellar temperatures and pressures along with the acceleration due to gravity at the surface (e.g.
Spectra of the system would also provide stellar temperatures and radial velocity values which in turn would provide an accurate q value and hence a unique solution to the binary parameters.
The wide range of stellar temperatures here is clearly displayed by the broad palette of colours visible in Hubble's image of Messier 9.
From the new knowledge about stellar temperatures, densities, and chemical composition, Bethe looked systematically for the possibilities of reactions under those conditions.